Store manager of the Bothell Helping Hands Thrift Store, Brittani Heitman, takes empty hangers to the back room to put more clothes onto the store floor. Madison Miller/staff photo.

Store manager of the Bothell Helping Hands Thrift Store, Brittani Heitman, takes empty hangers to the back room to put more clothes onto the store floor. Madison Miller/staff photo.

Helping Hands Thrift Store serves locally and globally

The Bothell thrift store provides self-sustaining resources to Peru and local community.

Helping Hands Ministries International has been serving locally and globally since 1992. Through three thrift stores in Western Washington, Helping Hands strives to help under-served people locally, in Peru, and worldwide. Their goal is to provide opportunities and services for those in need so they can be self-sustaining, be empowered and be hopeful for their future.

The Bothell store, located on Bothell Everett Highway, was the first established store of the franchise.

Run by a team of volunteers and a small staff, the store works to serve its local community as well as communities across the globe.

Executive director Shannon Field said being involved with the organization is part of her and her family’s DNA, as it was her mother and father-in-law who founded the nonprofit as missionaries in Peru.

“My second date with [my husband] was the opening of the thrift store when I was 16, so it’s kind of like part of our DNA now,” Field said. “We’ve been active in it since.”

Helping Hands Ministries International works to provide self-sustaining resources to people in Peru. Through a “community center model,” Peruvians are able to receive clean water, skill set education for women, preschool education for children and social services.

“By just giving these people some of life’s basic necessities such as clean water, to giving them opportunities for education, [it] can really change their lives,” she said.

For Field, being able to see the Peruvian children grow and thrive in education has been one of the most rewarding aspects in leading Helping Hands.

“We have one girl who’s now in high school and is on the path to going to medical school. That is really exciting. I don’t think it really gets much better than that,” she said.

While all the proceeds from the three Helping Hands thrift stores go to the needs in Peru, the Bothell thrift store also provides benefits to the local community.

“We give away about $100,000 a year of product to the community,” Field said.

The Bothell location gives out gift cards that are then distributed by the Bothell Fire Department, Northshore School District, food banks and local churches.

Other local nonprofits, such as Shower to the People — which provides mobile showers to the homeless — hand out gift cards for the store to people in need of clean clothes.

“Shower to the People come around twice a week to fill up on clean t-shirts, underwear and socks and gives them to the homeless,” Field said. “Our motto is, ‘We’ll give it away before we sell it.’ So, anyone in need can just come and ask.”

Field said she believes the success of Helping Hands stems from the fact that people trust the organization.

“They trust us that we’re doing what we say we’re doing,” she said. “Everything we do is to serve others and even the planet, as we recycle and reuse almost every single thing.”

Field hopes Helping Hands continues to grow and serve the local community and to those in Peru.

“Our goal is to always do right by the people we’re helping and the people who support us, and I think that’s going to help us keep going,” she said.

The Bothell Helping Hands Thrift Store was the first established location for the nonprofit in 1992. Madison Miller/staff photo.

The Bothell Helping Hands Thrift Store was the first established location for the nonprofit in 1992. Madison Miller/staff photo.

The Bothell thrift store provides self-sustaining resources to Peru and local community. Madison Miller/staff photo.

The Bothell thrift store provides self-sustaining resources to Peru and local community. Madison Miller/staff photo.

More in Business

Bothell and Kenmore real estate market transitions into fall

There may be less competition than last year but well-priced homes in great locations can still garner more than one offer.

BECU to expand Northshore presence with new financial center in Bothell

Local credit union to open new Neighborhood Financial Center next spring

Business networking open house coming to Kenmore Oct. 3

The event is sponsored by the city and the Bothell-Kenmore Chamber of Commerce.

Change to U.S.-backed condo loans comes as summer market wraps up

A monthly real estate snap shot by John L. Scott Real Estate.

First AG lawsuit against company no-poach clause ends with $150K payment

Jersey Mike’s had the contract provisions in place until April 2018.

Dr. Khalid Ahmed (left) and Dr. Elina Durchman are excited to start their new intensive program in Sept. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo
Bothell’s Center of Body Mind Intuition to start intensive outpatient program

Center’s intensive outpatient program to start end of September.

Courtesy photo 
                                Mercer Island financial adviser Bob Toomey recently summited Mount Shasta in California.
Financial success and mountaineering

The steps to achieving financial success mirror mountain climbing.

Real estate market holds steady as summer continues

Suburbs are on the rise, as many millennials may be priced out of city cores.

The new Bothell Friday Market will run from 3-8 p.m., every Friday through Sept. 27. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo
New Bothell Friday Market opens

Bothell Friday Market will run every Friday through Sept. 27

Kiddie Academy locations on the Eastside win national recognition

Six locally owned educational child care centers received an award for brand excellence and customer service.

Selection and steady sales characterize local market

Buyers can enjoy additional selection this summer as they look for the home of their choice.