Owner Dusty DuBois (center, with the scissors) celebrates the grand opening of Revolve True Food and Wine Bar alongside the restaurant’s staff. Contributed photo

Main Street a mainstay for local business owners

Bothell’s Main Street won’t be defeated by fire. Following the July 22 incident, the street in the heart of downtown has seen a variety of new businesses.

“They’re getting the vibrancy back to Main Street,” Greater Bothell Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Brittany Caldwell said of the new businesses.

One of them is Revolve True Food and Wine Bar, a restaurant located at 10024 Main Street that is dedicated to healthy eating with gluten-free, grain-free, non-GMO and organic offerings on the menu. The restaurant is owned by Dusty DuBois, owner of Bothell Chiropractic and Wellness, which is also located in the same building on Main Street.

DuBois decided to open Revolve after not being able to find a lot of places to eat that would accomodate her diet.

“I found it hard to find restaurants to meet my food goals,” she said.

Revolve currently offers dinner and will soon be expanding to lunch, breakfast and brunch.

“Dinner is a full-service, sit-down experience, and lunch and breakfast will be more fast-casual,” DuBois said.

DuBois is a longtime Bothell resident, and she’s been inspired by how the community has come together after the Main Street fire.

“When tragedy happens like that, people tend to rally,” she said, adding that August, the month after the fire, was the best month ever for business at Bothell Chiropractic and Wellness. “Bothell really rallied behind everyone.”

For more information about Revolve, visit revolvefoodwine.com.

Se-lyn Boutique

Lauren Dillon-Merrill is relocating her esoteric healing and holistic health business 3 Petals Healing from one location to another on Main Street and expanding with a new retail business, Se-lyn Boutique, scheduled to open Dec. 3.

“It’s such a strong community,” Dillon-Merrill said of her decision to keep the business in Bothell. “The community and business owners are really connected.”

Se-lyn Boutique, which is located at 10124 Main Street (the old Bothell Antiques site), will sell crystals, jewelry and clothing.

“There isn’t really a good place to go clothes shopping in Bothell,” Dillon-Merrill said of her reasoning behind expanding her business.

For more information about Se-lyn Boutique, visit selynboutique.com.

Level Seven Salon

Businesses affected by the fire are starting to make their way back, too. Level Seven Salon owner Andrya Rytter will be reopening her business at 10127 Main Street (the former location of Paul Richards Clothing) in early 2017.

In the time between the fire and the reopening of the new salon, the Level Seven stylists have been able to maintain their clientele by working at other salons.

“So many of us have had these clients for years,” Rytter said. “You miss a haircut cycle or two, and they need to move on. There’s no way to measure how valuable that’s been.”

When looking for a new location, the Paul Richards Clothing space was Rytter’s first choice, as she couldn’t imagine leaving Main Street.

“Main Street in Bothell is just a very unique little family of business owners,” she said. “Leaving that family would’ve been even more devastating after the fire.”

For more information about Level Seven Salon, visit levelsevensalon.com.

Main Street enhancement

At its Nov. 18 meeting, the Washington State Transportation Improvement Board (TIB) awarded the City of Bothell $4.7 million for its Main Street Enhancement Project, Phase I, now scheduled for construction in 2017.

“The city, on behalf of all our downtown businesses, wishes to thank the TIB Board for this grant award, and Gov. Jay Inslee for his strong support,” Bothell Mayor Andy Rheaume said.

The TIB is an independent agency created by the Legislature. The TIB selects projects annually on a competitive basis for transportation infrastructure improvements.

The $7 million Main Street Enhancement project has been planned for some time but has taken on a greater urgency after the Main Street fire last summer. This project is one of 12 top priority goals for 2017-18 that the Bothell City Council recently identified and is a key component of the Downtown Revitalization Plan. It addresses the historic section of downtown, with the goal of keeping it a viable, attractive location to work, live, visit and shop. The project provides Main Street improvements that will tie historic Main Street into the development of public spaces with the city’s downtown core.

“While change can sometimes be challenging, the Main Street merchants are looking forward to a renewed vibrancy on Main Street, especially after the devastating fire,” said Cheryl Bosh, treasurer of the Greater Bothell Chamber of Commerce and a Main Street merchant. “All we need is continued community support — please shop on Main Street during the construction.”

The Main Street Enhancement project will improve Main Street from Bothell Way to 104th Avenue NE. The first phase of the project will improve Main Street between Bothell Way to just east of the 102nd Avenue NE intersection. The project reworks the entire streetscape from building front to building front. The project will include a flexible parking zone for parallel parking that could be used for other purposes such as outdoor cafe seating. This project also includes replacement of storm, sewer and water utilities within the street cross-section.

For more information on the project, visit www.bothellwa.gov/MainStEnhance.

Members of the Se-lyn Boutique team pose for a picture. The store opens Dec. 3 on Main Street in Bothell. Contributed photo

Level Seven Salon is pictured before the July 22 fire that destroyed it and several other businesses on Main Street. The salon will reopen in a new location at the beginning of 2017. Contributed photo

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