Snohomish executive approves contract for solid waste services

The Solid Waste Division will leverage significant annual savings to offset cost increases.

  • Friday, May 4, 2018 10:55am
  • Life

A new contract with Republic Services could achieve over $36 million dollars in savings over twenty years for Snohomish County residents. On March 26, Snohomish County executive Dave Somers signed and authorized the final version of the contract with the current receiving transport and disposal service provider.

“Costs associated with waste processing, including labor and equipment, continue to escalate,” said executive Somers in a press release. “The savings associated with this contract will help us on our mission to provide long-term stable rates in our community, while maintaining a high level of service.”

Republic’s new pricing for the initial ten year period is $3.70 per ton less than the current rate. This is about $1.8M in annual savings for the approximate 500,000 tons of waste per year Snohomish County sends to Klickitat County for disposal. The savings will be used to negate an estimated $1 million dollar annual loss in grant funding from Department of Ecology’s Washington State Model Toxics Control Account. In addition, the funds will be used for investment in site improvements, including the replacement of two compactors and the launch of a new latex paint recycling and disposal program.

“The contract is one of the largest issued by Snohomish County,” said Matt Zybas, director of Solid Waste Services in a press release. “We are always looking for ways to constrain costs while maintaining a high level of service. This contract is a part of our continued commitment to improved service and cost savings for the residents of Snohomish County.”

Snohomish County and Republic Services entered into negotiations in August of 2017 for solid waste transport and disposal services. Both parties met on multiple occasions to develop the final version of a 10-year contract. The current contract can be renewed for two additional five year terms after the completion of the initial ten year contract.

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