HUD awards Snohomish County $10 million for youth homeless

They are among 11 organizations nationwide that will try to “get young people off the streets.”

  • Wednesday, July 18, 2018 8:30am
  • Life

The Washington State Department of Commerce and Snohomish County are among 11 organizations nationwide that have won U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Youth Homeless Prevention Demonstration Project funding to use a wide range of housing interventions including rapid rehousing, permanent supportive housing, transitional housing, and host homes in preventing and ending youth homelessness.

Today HUD announced that it is awarding the Washington Department of Commerce $4,629,391 and Snohomish County was awarded $2,387,593 in Youth Homeless Prevention Project funds. Other communities awarded funds include Boston, Columbus, Lincoln, Louisville, Nashville, San Diego, Santa Fe, the State of Vermont and three Tribes in northwest Minnesota. The Municipality of Anchorage and the Seattle-King County Continuum of Care were awarded Youth Homeless Prevention Demonstration grants in 2017.

To ensure the Youth Homelessness Prevention Demonstration Program meets the needs of young people, HUD relied upon the recommendations of young people who experienced homelessness themselves. Many of these same young people participated in reviewing the applications of communities seeking YHDP funds. Their input helped ensure that the communities selected for funding understand the needs and preferences of the young people they will serve. HUD also worked closely with its federal partners at the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Department of Education (DOE), and the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH) to help develop the program and review applications.

“Young people who are victims of abuse, family conflict or aging out of foster care are especially vulnerable to homelessness,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson in a press release. “We are working with our local partners to support innovative approaches to help young people find stable housing, break the cycle of homelessness and lead them on a path to self-sufficiency.”

“The sight of anyone living on the streets is heartbreaking. But the sight of a young person sleeping in a doorway or rustling through a garbage bin is especially sad,” said HUD Northwest Regional Administrator Jeff McMorris in a press release. “Like last year’s Youth Homeless Prevention Program grantees, this year’s grantees have demonstrated success in helping homeless young people off the streets and getting their lives back on track. Expanding and building on their successes, we hope they will serve as examples of how other communities can do the same.”

“Our highest calling is to protect our most vulnerable residents,” said Dave Somers, Snohomish County Executive in a press release. “Our local partners and this project will allow us to protect thousands of youth who find themselves in harm’s way. We appreciate the support of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development and their commitment to our community. We will continue to pursue innovative and compassionate solutions to these widespread challenges.”

The Washington State Department of Commerce serves as the Continuum of Care organization working with local projects in 34 small- and medium-sized, mostly-rural counties to prevent and end homelessness. In January 2017 its point-in-time count of the homeless identified 314 unaccompanied homeless young people in its jurisdiction. It has one of the strongest commitments to addressing youth homelessness in the nation. Strategic efforts underway include: preventing youth from exiting public systems of care (such as child welfare and juvenile justice) into homelessness, developing a crisis response system for families and youth in conflict, and closing educational equity gaps for homeless students.

Snohomish County Human Services Department (HSD) will build on successful innovative practices that have transformed the Everett/Snohomish County Continuum of Care homeless response system, to further transform the homeless youth response under the Youth Homeless Demonstration Program. Its Continuum of Care’s January 2017 point-in-time count identified 117 unaccompanied homeless young people under the age of 24.

HUD selected 11 communities nationwide which will collaborate with a broad array of partners including a youth action board and the local or state public child welfare agency. These communities now have four months to develop and submit to HUD a coordinated community plan to prevent and end youth homelessness. They will also participate in a program evaluation to inform the federal effort to prevent and end youth homelessness going forward and will serve as leaders in the nation on the work to end homelessness among young people.

YHDP recipients will use funding for rapid rehousing, permanent supportive housing, and transitional housing, and to fund innovative programs, such as host homes. Recipients can begin requesting funding for specific projects as soon as they are ready. YHDP will also support youth-focused performance measurement and coordinated entry systems. Over the next several months, selected communities will work with their youth advisory boards, child welfare agencies, and other community partners to create a comprehensive community plan to end youth homelessness.

More in Life

Townsend to speak on turning forests into biofuel at Northshore Senior Center

This event is set for Feb. 28 and is free and open to all.

From left, Clara Ling (franchise owner) and Daisy Quitugua (center director) at the soft opening of Code Ninjas on Feb. 1. Madison Miller/staff photo
Bothell resident opens coding center in Newcastle

This is the first Code Ninjas center in Washington.

Songwriter group to hold showcase to benefit incoming Kirkland shelter

The showcase will be from 6-9 p.m. Feb. 9 at the Den Coffee Shop in Bothell.

Despite ‘wait-and-see’ approach from Feds on interest rates, real estate ticking onward

Though the feds are in a wait-and-see mood there are benefits to buying and/or selling now versus waiting

PopUp Storywalk blends books and nature in Northshore

The program combines the joy of reading with the beauty of the great outdoors.

IHS junior Sam Trott and sophomore Daisy Held play Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet in IHS’s upcoming production of “Pride and Prejudice.” Madison Miller/staff photo.
Inglemoor takes on Jane Austen

The school’s first show of the new year will be the author’s “Pride and Prejudice.”

United Way offering free tax help on UW Bothell, Cascadia campus

The service will be available twice a week through April 16.

Adman to speak at Northshore Senior Center on local water systems

The president of the Sno-King Watershed Council will speak on how they are monitoring the area’s water systems.

How housing price increases have affected Bothell

House values have roughly doubled in the last 10 years.

On Jan. 5, participants ran a 5K or 10K race at the Worst Day of the Year Run. Hundreds of participants dressed up in costume to run/walk. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo.
McMenamins hosts 5K, 10K walk/run in Bothell

Hundreds participate in 5K, 10K walk/run on the traditionally the “worst” weather day of the year.

New Year resolution: Be more loving to yourself

Now is a good time to reflect back on accomplishments and goals achieved from the last year.