Motivation springs us to action

Progress doesn’t come overnight and maintaining health is almost always hard work.

  • Tuesday, January 29, 2019 8:30am
  • Life

By Allison Apfelbaum

Special to the Reporter

As I wonder about all of your 2019 resolutions I ask you: Are you still able to keep up what you set out to do?

Statistics show that about 80 percent of people stop doing their New Year resolutions by mid-February. Yes, I repeat, mid-February! I want to talk to you about how to keep up that motivation for the rest of the year.

Goal setting for one is not always easy. We tend to set goals that are too unattainable for what we are currently capable of, setting ourselves up for failure. I encourage you to look at what you are currently doing and set some realistic short-term goals as well as long-term goals. The short-term goals should be closer to what you are currently doing. For example, working out one or two days more than you are, consuming 10 percent fewer calories than you are, etc. A weight loss goal of 1-2 pounds per week is a reasonable goal, try not to expect too much of yourself.

Also, go easy on yourself if you feel like you are failing. No one gets to their goals in a linear fashion. Some weeks you won’t have the time to workout at all, but that doesn’t mean you failed or you should give up. One lazy day of eating doesn’t mess you up for the month. This time next year you will be wishing you restarted your resolutions tomorrow. If you feel like you try your best every day, you are doing better than you were when you started. Progress doesn’t come overnight and maintaining health is almost always hard work.

Motivation is a strong word and without it, doing anything at all would be impossible. For example, you are motivated to do what you are doing every day at every moment. If you are sitting on the couch watching TV, you are motivated to do that.

So how will you get from the couch to the gym? Ask yourself, what is sitting on the couch doing for me? Is it relaxing you or because you are too tired at the end of the day to workout? Then we can work on those things to bring more relaxation to your life, stress reduction and improving energy so you have more motivation to exercise.

Remember that self-care is just as important to health.

I encourage you in this moment to write down all of the major accomplishments you have achieved throughout your entire life. Then feel how proud you are of yourself. It is possible to have the things you want, and to feel proud of yourself each and every day if you choose that.

We tend to do things within our comfort zone because it is easier. For example, sticking to the same dinner recipes because it’s what we know or repeating the same workouts. This goes for relationships too, keeping people around who are not adding value in a positive manner. I encourage you to try a little bit more every day to jump out of that comfort zone. Try a new recipe, join an exercise class or talk to a stranger who looks friendly.

Whatever your personal goals are, it is not too late to start right now. When you are feeling down or like you have failed, just remind yourself that all of it is part of the journey of moving forward.

Allison Apfelbaum is a Primary care Naturopathic Doctor at Tree of Health Integrative Medicine clinic in Woodinville. To learn more go to www.treeofhealthmedicine.com or call 425-408-0040 to schedule an appointment.

More in Life

‘American Pickers’ puts out call for antique finds

The History Channel show is coming to Washington and seeking finds throughout the state, including the Eastside.

Romero to speak at next Pub Talk at McMenamins

He will speak about how arsenic was used historically as a common pesticide, spreading poison across the United States.

Inglemoor’s Vuu serves as page in State House

Pages’ responsibilities range from presenting the flags to distributing amendments on the House floor.

Wastemobile begins household hazardous waste collection season in Bothell, Feb. 22-24

Visit Wastemobile website for details about acceptable materials and amounts, plus upcoming collection events and convenient, permanent disposal sites

Townsend to speak on turning forests into biofuel at Northshore Senior Center

This event is set for Feb. 28 and is free and open to all.

From left, Clara Ling (franchise owner) and Daisy Quitugua (center director) at the soft opening of Code Ninjas on Feb. 1. Madison Miller/staff photo
Bothell resident opens coding center in Newcastle

This is the first Code Ninjas center in Washington.

Cotton to speak at next Pub Night Talks event at McMenamins

He will discuss Frederick Law Olmsted’s legacy of including green spaces in urban planning.

Bothell offers insight on rainy season streams and gardening

Locals can learn how to prepare their garden for spring and offer input on future workshops.

IHS junior Sam Trott and sophomore Daisy Held play Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet in IHS’s upcoming production of “Pride and Prejudice.” Madison Miller/staff photo.
Inglemoor takes on Jane Austen

The school’s first show of the new year will be the author’s “Pride and Prejudice.”

United Way offering free tax help on UW Bothell, Cascadia campus

The service will be available twice a week through April 16.

Adman to speak at Northshore Senior Center on local water systems

The president of the Sno-King Watershed Council will speak on how they are monitoring the area’s water systems.