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UW-Bothell, city of Bothell benefit from Gov. Gregoire's $1 billion stimulus plan

Some of those pictured are Gov. Chris Gregoire, University of Washington, Bothell Associated Student President Freddie Hensen, UW-Bothell Chancellor Kenyon Chan, UW-Bothell Vice Chancellor Richard Penny, UW-Bothell Vice Chancellor Marilyn Cox, UW-Bothell professor Bill Erdly and Sen. Derek Kilmer, who was the lead in the Senate to negotiate the two capital budgets.  - Courtesy photo
Some of those pictured are Gov. Chris Gregoire, University of Washington, Bothell Associated Student President Freddie Hensen, UW-Bothell Chancellor Kenyon Chan, UW-Bothell Vice Chancellor Richard Penny, UW-Bothell Vice Chancellor Marilyn Cox, UW-Bothell professor Bill Erdly and Sen. Derek Kilmer, who was the lead in the Senate to negotiate the two capital budgets.
— image credit: Courtesy photo

Thanks to Gov. Chris Gregoire signing a supplemental capital budget last month, the city of Bothell and the University of Washington, Bothell can put to use a good chunk of money to fund a medical project and build a science facility.

The stimulus plan, signed at Tacoma Community College on April 23, will invest $1 billion into a projected 18,000 family wage construction jobs across the state.

“Jobs are the way out of this recession,” said Gregoire of signing Senate bills 6074 and 5127. “I’m proud to sign a package that makes our state stronger, and invests in Washington’s future.”

According to Terrie Battuello, Bothell assistant city manager/economic development manager, the city will receive $500,000 to fund a project for the Bothell Med Tech Manufacturing Innovation Partnership Zone (IPZ) — its second $500,000 grant for this purpose.

"This support from the state helps to fund the IPZ's goals for creating an incubator and expanding it to a center of excellence for the med-tech industry in Bothell over the next few years," she wrote in an e-mail, also noting the partnership with the University of Washington C4C, Bothell and Lake Washington Technical Institute programs.

Funding will also allow the city and IPZ to move forward with its plans for a larger facility catering to the med-tech industry through office, conference and hospitality services located in Canyon Park.

At UW-Bothell, $63 million will go toward the 74,000-square-foot building — known as UW 3 — which will house 11 science labs, several classrooms, gathering space and a 200-person lecture hall. This space translates into the ability to serve an additional 1,000 students each year. It is the first building to be constructed on the UW-Bothell campus in 10 years.

“This gives UW-Bothell the ability to expand access to a high-quality education, providing students and future students with the opportunity to realize their educational dreams,” said UW-Bothell Chancellor Kenyon Chan.

Added Freddie Hensen, president of the Association of Students of the University of Washington, Bothell (ASUWB): “The students are overjoyed with the commitment the state is making in this campus to provide more opportunities for students in the future and our ability to make a difference in the world."

Other educational beneficiaries from the stimulus plan include Washington State University, which secured $37 million for its Riverpoint Biomedical and Health Sciences Building, continuing their growing medical training and life sciences programs.

Also, $78 million will go toward energy efficiency grants for higher education, K-12 schools and local governments to generate savings that can in turn be re-invested in the classroom.

The capital budget also includes significant enhancements to our other vital sectors — economic development, housing and weatherization enhancements, sustainable energy improvements, natural resource preservation and local government infrastructure enhancements.

 

 

 

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