A view of the Tolt barrier project. Photo courtesy of King County

A view of the Tolt barrier project. Photo courtesy of King County

Barrier that protects Eastside water to be repaired

The barrier protects a pipeline that delivers water to various Eastside cities and Seattle.

Work will begin soon to restore a barrier that protects a crucial water pipeline near Duvall.

The Tolt Pipeline Protection project will rebuild and improve some 1,200 feet of rock barriers along the Snoqualmie River south of the city. The pipeline is a crucial one for the area’s water supply as it pumps water to cities, including Bellevue, Bothell, Redmond and Seattle from the South Fork Tolt River Reservoir.

The barrier sits between a curve in the Snoqualmie River and the pipelines and was installed in the 1960s. Since then, erosion and river migration has severely damaged the barrier. The river is moving toward the pipeline, and if the barrier is not repaired, continued migration will eventually damage the pipeline.

The restoration project will include placing 760 large boulders and log structures near the river to reinforce the barrier. A small, collapsed culvert at Deer Creek will be removed and replaced some 600 feet upstream from its current location on the banks of the Snoqualmie River. The new culvert will be equipped with a floodgate and will not impede fish passage.

The project will cost roughly $10.2 million and is funded through the King County Flood Control District. Construction is expected to be completed in October.

Kathy Lambert, a King County council member who sits on the district’s board of directors, said the project is one of a slew that the flood district is working on. The district was formed in 2007 and identifies and completes projects to help reduce flooding and damages in the county.

Lambert said that due to regulations surrounding permitting, many projects have been in the works for years and are just now moving to construction. Many areas in the Snoqualmie valley are being studied for future projects, including roadway repairs, levee improvements and additional river bank repairs.

One large potential project could be the clearing out of a collection of rocks, known as an alluvial fan, near North Bend in the Snoqualmie River. These rocks build up near the three forks section of the river and slow water, which can lead to backups and flooding. However, Lambert said if they take action to clear it they would ensure the increased flow didn’t create more problems downstream.

“Those need to be cleaned on a regular basis,” she said.

County residents can sign up for flood alerts at the King County flood services website.

More in News

The Council recognized the AFIS program as it celebrates 30 years of assisting law enforcement throughout King County. Councilmembers, AFIS staff and King County Sheriff Mitzi Johanknecht join AFIS regional manager, Carol Gillespie. Photo courtesy of King County.
King County Council recognizes county’s Automated Fingerprint Information System

For three decades, AFIS has helped law enforcement solve thousands of cases.

‘This might have been a once in a generation opportunity’: Kenmore’s Lakepointe deal grinds to a halt

City officials unsure of what comes next for the more than 50 acre industrial site.

King County Flood Control District approves 2019 Budget on Nov. 5. Photo courtesy of King County Flood Control District.
King County Flood Control District approves $93 million budget

The 2019 District Budget will maintain current flood protection services.

Student veterans receive new resource center at UW Bothell

The Veterans Resource Center at UW Bothell was created after student veterans indicated they wanted a space designated for themselves.

Bothell voters approve public safety ballot measures

As of election night on Nov. 6, both the levy and bond were passing.

Democrats lead in 46th Legislative District

Voters are sending David Frockt, Gerry Pollet and Javier Valdez back to Olympia.

Democrats lead in 1st Legislative District

Derek Stanford and Shelley Kloba were successful in their re-election bids.

DelBene leads in 1st Congressional District in early returns

As of election night, incumbent Suzan DelBene was leading with 69 percent of the vote, to Jeffrey Beeler’s 31 percent.

UW Bothell Student Veterans Services held an Open House and Coffee event during this year’s Welcome Week and remains the main arm in helping veterans. The new resource center adds to this support. Photo courtesy of Marc Studer, UW Bothell
UW Bothell opens new veterans resource center on campus

The new Veteran Resource Center is designed to connect veterans and build relationships.

In Kenmore, the SMP applies to Lake Washington, Sammamish River, and Swamp Creek and associated wetlands. Bothell’s SMP, which was last updated in 2013, also governs development next to the Sammamish River (pictured) and Swamp Creek, along with North Creek. Photo courtesy of Mark Hussein
Bothell, Kenmore look to protect shorelines

Shoreline master programs protect and restore valuable aquatic resources for future generations.

Ashe joins Bothell as new economic development manager

She will work cooperatively with both long-time and future business owners in the city.

Said Farzad reportedly called in numerous bomb threats to state agency offices in Olympia. No bombs have been found, but the state agencies are increasing police presence and bomb-sniffing dogs. Reporter File Photo
Suspended psychiatrist suspected of making bomb threats

The suspect was previously convicted of telephone harassment of a Bothell insurance company and has reportedly called in numerous threats from various countries. No bombs have been found.