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Bastyr University president to step down due to health concerns

  • Thursday, July 27, 2017 10:41am
  • News

Bastyr University announced this week that its president, Dr. Charles “Mac” Powell, will be stepping down after two years in the role due to “recent health concerns.” The change is effective immediately.

Powell’s “health concerns have caused him to reassess his work-life balance,” a Wednesday press release read.

Chair of Bastyr’s board of trustees Harlan Patterson will step in for Powell in the interim while the university searches for a permanent president.

“During this interim period, Mr. Patterson will continue to guide the University in the execution of its five-year strategic plan,” read the release.

Patterson, who has served in a number of executive capacities with the University of Washington, said that Powell “positioned Bastyr University for growth during the coming years.”

“We anticipate building upon the opportunities he has created to see that Bastyr remains a leader in the natural health arts and sciences,” Patterson said in a press release.

Powell joined Bastyr University in July 2015.

“Under his leadership, the University increased naturopathic medical residency opportunities for its students, developed an extensive practice management and business toolkit for graduating students, doubled the University’s health policy and advocacy efforts, achieved record fundraising, and forged collaborative initiatives with an unprecedented number of research, academic and clinical partners,” according to the release. “Bastyr University is positioned to add a third campus this coming fall in Austin, Texas, through an affiliation with AOMA Graduate School of Integrative Medicine.”

Bastyr University is a nonprofit, private unviersity focusing on natural medicine. The university has a campus in Kenmore and San Diego.

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