Bothell City Hall. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Bothell City Hall. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Bothell approves six-year transportation plan

The plan requires an annual update.

Several projects were added in an update to Bothell’s transportation improvement plan that could help traffic flow more smoothly through the city.

The Bothell City Council approved an update to its six-year transportation improvement plan on May 7 for work that will be conducted between 2020 and 2025. The report is updated annually to account for finished projects and needed improvements.

Bothell transportation planner Sherman Goong said the city had completed the first phase of its Main Street enhancement plan in addition to several pavement preservation and roadway sealing projects. New projects that were added included an update to the Canyon Park subarea plan, emergency and spot improvements program and modeling.

The planning process lasts around nine months, beginning in the spring and ending with adoption by council in late fall. The transportation improvement plan reflects this process and must be approved by the council by July 1.

Several projects on the current list include modifying roads and traffic signals in the city’s downtown core, including widening Beardsley Boulevard and constructing a traffic signal at 240th Street Southeast and Meridian Avenue South in addition to sidewalks, crosswalks and ramps.

Last October the city was awarded more than $4.5 million in transportation funding from the Puget Sound Regional Council. Around $2.27 million will be going towards widening Bothell Way south of the Snohomish County line to Reder Way. The rest will be going to widening the Bothell-Everett Highway from 240th Street Southeast to Snohomish County, overlaying Juanita Woodinville Way and Northeast 160th Street and completing a portion of the North Creek Trail.

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