Bothell’s new assistant city manager starts May 20

Kellye Mazzoli was hired on about 18 months after the previous assistant city manager was announced.

Kellye Mazzoli. Photo courtesy of city fo Bothell

Kellye Mazzoli. Photo courtesy of city fo Bothell

The city of Bothell has named a new assistant city manager, who started her job on May 20, about 18 months after the previous assistant city manager was announced in November 2017.

Kellye Mazzoli now fills the position after a targeted recruitment effort from the city in recent months. Mazzoli has 13 years of experience in municipal management as assistant city manager of Woodinville, assistant to the mayor in the city of Oak Harbor and assistant to the city manager in the city of Burleson, Texas.

“Kellye brings the needed level of experience to this position with a proven track record of getting things done, both of which are critical for an assistant city manager,” Bothell city manager Jennifer Phillips said. “We are very excited to have her join the Bothell team.”

Mazzoli has particular experience in human resources, emergency management, community relations and inter-governmental relations with a masters of public administration from the University of Texas. She will oversee the city’s emergency preparedness, tourism and communications as the assistant city manager.

“Kellye’s collaborative leadership style coupled with her tenancy to get things done is the right combination for Bothell,” Phillips said. “Based on Kellye’s education and experience, she was invited for an interview with the executive leadership team and members of the executive office.”

Additionally, Mazzoli is actively involved in city manager groups, serving on the International City Managers Association International Committee.

“I am so thrilled to join the city of Bothell family! It’s the mix of great energy, dynamic thinking, and overall high quality of life that attracted me here,” Mazzoli said in a press release. “I look forward to building meaningful, authentic partnerships with the community, truly focused on connecting Bothell residents and businesses to the local government services most important to them.”

The previous assistant city manager, Victoria Brazitis, started work for the city on Dec. 28, relieving pressure from numerous city projects and new council member inductions.

“This position is critical to the city’s continued delivery of key services to our community including human services, community engagement, senior services and regional [and] statewide engagement all of which remain top priorities for the Bothell City Council,” Phillips said.

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