Bill Bryant makes campaign phone calls along with a volunteer. Aaron Kunkler/Bothell Reporter

Bryant draws volunteers, protesters in Bothell

Washington State gubernatorial candidate Bill Bryant met with supporters today at the McMenamins Anderson School in Bothell.

Washington State gubernatorial candidate Bill Bryant met with supporters today at the McMenamins Anderson School in Bothell.

He met with around 25 volunteers to kick-start a phone campaign in advance of the Aug. 2 primary elections.

His campaign will be stopping in 23 cities across the state during this election tour. They will be focusing, in particular, on some 100,000 conservative voters his campaign identified as not likely to vote in this election without prompting.

“We’ve got to get these people engaged and let them know that their vote really matters,” Bryant said.

In Bryant’s mind, Gov. Jay Inslee won the last election not because Democrats voted for him, but because Republicans didn’t vote.

After a short dialogue the volunteers were presented with a list of names and began making phone calls.

Bryant’s appearance also drew a group of Democratic protesters holding signs outside, voicing opposition to both him and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump.

In a statement, 1st Legislative District Democrats Chair Dan Wilner said: “We’re here to speak out against the Trump, Bryant agenda. They present a dangerous agenda that will take us back on LGBT rights, preventing gun violence and the minimum wage.”

Bryant is a conservative and current member of the elected King County and Seattle Port Commission.

His positions on many issues falls in line with standard conservative views.

On transportation, Bryant thinks putting infrastructure engineering to the forefront will help the region, instead of what he called a current focus on social engineering.

He proposes increasing bus rapid transit in congested corridors as an alternative to large-scale light rail expansions.

Returning one of the toll lanes along Interstate 405 to a general purpose lane was also on his bucket list.

“That’s what the people paid for, that’s what they were promised,” he said.

In terms of education reform, Bryant said he wants to focus on increasing graduation rates.

He said schools in Sunnyside and Granger in the lower Yakima Valley are good examples of high graduation rates achieved through administrative leadership.

He also supports redesigning high school curriculum to allow greater job training opportunities during the final two years.

Bryant has spoken out against the Affordable Care Act, saying it creates fewer full-time jobs Crosscut has reported he was critical of Inslee’s welcoming of Syrian Refugees to the state.

Bryant also opposes a uniform raising of the minimum wage, saying wage increases should be tailored to meet the needs of individual counties.

And while local Democrats view Bryant’s campaign as tied to Trump’s presidential bid, he said he will be focusing on issues closer to home.

“I’m gonna focus on the issues that a Governor focuses on,” he said.

Michael Green was volunteering for Bryant and said his down-to-earth demeanor attracted him to Bryant’s campaign.

A view which other volunteers shared.

“He’s definitely got the right heart for the leadership we would need to see,” Green said.

More in News

The Council recognized the AFIS program as it celebrates 30 years of assisting law enforcement throughout King County. Councilmembers, AFIS staff and King County Sheriff Mitzi Johanknecht join AFIS regional manager, Carol Gillespie. Photo courtesy of King County.
King County Council recognizes county’s Automated Fingerprint Information System

For three decades, AFIS has helped law enforcement solve thousands of cases.

‘This might have been a once in a generation opportunity’: Kenmore’s Lakepointe deal grinds to a halt

City officials unsure of what comes next for the more than 50 acre industrial site.

King County Flood Control District approves 2019 Budget on Nov. 5. Photo courtesy of King County Flood Control District.
King County Flood Control District approves $93 million budget

The 2019 District Budget will maintain current flood protection services.

Student veterans receive new resource center at UW Bothell

The Veterans Resource Center at UW Bothell was created after student veterans indicated they wanted a space designated for themselves.

Bothell voters approve public safety ballot measures

As of election night on Nov. 6, both the levy and bond were passing.

Democrats lead in 46th Legislative District

Voters are sending David Frockt, Gerry Pollet and Javier Valdez back to Olympia.

Democrats lead in 1st Legislative District

Derek Stanford and Shelley Kloba were successful in their re-election bids.

DelBene leads in 1st Congressional District in early returns

As of election night, incumbent Suzan DelBene was leading with 69 percent of the vote, to Jeffrey Beeler’s 31 percent.

UW Bothell Student Veterans Services held an Open House and Coffee event during this year’s Welcome Week and remains the main arm in helping veterans. The new resource center adds to this support. Photo courtesy of Marc Studer, UW Bothell
UW Bothell opens new veterans resource center on campus

The new Veteran Resource Center is designed to connect veterans and build relationships.

In Kenmore, the SMP applies to Lake Washington, Sammamish River, and Swamp Creek and associated wetlands. Bothell’s SMP, which was last updated in 2013, also governs development next to the Sammamish River (pictured) and Swamp Creek, along with North Creek. Photo courtesy of Mark Hussein
Bothell, Kenmore look to protect shorelines

Shoreline master programs protect and restore valuable aquatic resources for future generations.

Ashe joins Bothell as new economic development manager

She will work cooperatively with both long-time and future business owners in the city.

Said Farzad reportedly called in numerous bomb threats to state agency offices in Olympia. No bombs have been found, but the state agencies are increasing police presence and bomb-sniffing dogs. Reporter File Photo
Suspended psychiatrist suspected of making bomb threats

The suspect was previously convicted of telephone harassment of a Bothell insurance company and has reportedly called in numerous threats from various countries. No bombs have been found.