Cascadia College offers career track degrees in biology, homeland security emergency management

  • Thursday, October 5, 2017 1:30am
  • News

Cascadia College is offering two new associate degrees for students this fall.

The Homeland Security Emergency Management degree provides career-bound students with practical experience to prepare them for emergency management jobs in state, local and federal government.

HSEM is a professional-technical degree that blends face-to-face and online instruction. It is designed to teach students about natural, technological and man-made risks facing our nation and help them develop in-demand skills needed in the growing field of Homeland Security.

“We need to build tomorrow’s emergency managers today,” said Darren Branum, Emergency Preparedness Manager for Cascadia College and the UW Bothell campus, in a press release. “Emergency Management programs are vital for the continued safety of our communities.”

The associate in biology degree is the most direct path for students planning to transfer to a four-year college or university to complete their Bachelor of Science in biology.

“The associate in biology degree at Cascadia College offers students the chance to get a head start on their bachelor’s in Biology,” says Dr. Todd Lundberg, Dean for Student Learning at Cascadia College. “Cascadia offers smaller class sizes at one third of the cost of Washington’s two largest state universities.”

The associate in biology degree is ideal for the student who is interested in the biological sciences and plans to transfer to a specific four-year program in Washington State. The degree is part of the Washington State Direct Transfer Agreement, so students who complete the degree transfer as a junior.

Fall quarter at Cascaia College begins Sept. 27. Students are encouraged to meet with an advisor to discuss their destination college’s degree requirements.

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