The Kenmore City Council announced Suzanne Greathouse and Nathan Loutsis as the newest members of the Planning Commission. Loutsis is the first student to join the commission. Photo courtesy of the City of Kenmore.

The Kenmore City Council announced Suzanne Greathouse and Nathan Loutsis as the newest members of the Planning Commission. Loutsis is the first student to join the commission. Photo courtesy of the City of Kenmore.

Inglemoor’s Loutsis joins Planning Commission

Nathan Loutsis is the first high school student to serve on a commission in Kenmore.

The Kenmore City Council announced Suzanne Greathouse and Nathan Loutsis as the newest members of the city’s Planning Commission.

Greathouse joins the commission as a five-year Kenmore resident and an active community member. She also serves on the Kenmore Heritage Society and Northshore Senior Center boards of directors.

Loutsis joins as the first-ever high school student to serve on a commission. He is currently a junior at Inglemoor High School (IHS). He has held several leadership positions in the National Honor Society at IHS and serves as student body treasurer. Loutsis is an instructor and senior official in Northlake Little League and a volunteer sergeant with the King County Sheriff’s Department Explorer Program.

Kenmore Mayor David Baker stated in a release that they are excited about the new commissioners.

“City Council firmly believes the Planning Commission should reflect our diverse community and this is the first time a student will serve,” he said in the release. “Who is better to help us plan for the future?”

Helping plan the future is exactly what 16-year-old Loutsis plans to do. He said he is excited to be personally involved with the future of the city.

“I feel like I’m starting something new,” said Loutsis. “There hasn’t been youth representation in city government. Doing something like this can inspire others and help lead to more representation across the state for youth who want to help represent [their] demographic.”

As the first youth planning commissioner, Loutsis said it’s a way to represent the next generation of Kenmore residents, business owners and people who will make up the city.

During his two-year term, Loutsis hopes to help improve Kenmore in any way possible. He believes updating certain parts of the city will benefit Kenmore residents and their economy.

Loutsis also believes a youthful perspective will bring diverse ideas.

“I believe that some youth voice is critical,” he said. “The youth in our city are the future.”

By being the first student in the commission, Loutsis hopes to be a bridge between the city government and the youth of the city. He hopes young people will share their ideas with him so he can present them to the commission for future project ideas.

Loutsis stressed the importance of voicing opinions.

“Youth and other people shouldn’t let their age or physical appearance hold them back [from their] opinions,” he said. “The government needs representation from all groups that are affected.”

The seven-member Planning Commission meets at 7 p.m. on the first and third Tuesday of every month at Kenmore City Hall.

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