Kenmore mobile home owners prepare for affordable housing discussions

The city currently has a moratorium on mobile home park redevelopment through May 11.

The Association of Manufactured Home Owners recently held an informational meeting earlier this month to educate local manufactured or mobile home owners on Kenmore’s upcoming talks on affordable housing preservation.

AMHO held the meeting at the Northshore Fire Department in Kenmore and had to ask attendees to sit in the lobby as the room was quickly filled beyond capacity. More than 100 local mobile home owners attended the meeting to learn about how to participate in the city Planning Commission’s discussions on affordable housing.

Currently, the city maintains a moratorium on mobile home park redevelopment. The moratorium, which lasts until May, 11, restricts any mobile home redevelopment.

Lauri Anderson, Kenmore’s senior planner, attended the meeting and said the city has no current protections for mobile home parks. The moratorium is meant to temporarily prevent any redevelopment proposals until the commission can make recommendations to city council on potential regulations.

According to the city, the commission is considering multiple options and want to hear from local mobile home owners at upcoming meetings.

Anderson addressed the issue at Tuesday’s City Council meeting, after the Reporter’s deadline. The city has arranged for a Spanish interpreter to attend the planning commission meeting on Jan. 30.

Anderson added that the city will notify mobile home park residents about future meetings through letters. The letters will include a Spanish translation.

AMHO encouraged communities to form homeowners associations to keep a balanced relationship with the land owners.

AMHO is a state nonprofit organization that aims to educate and preserve mobile home communities.

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