Kenmore mobile home owners prepare for affordable housing discussions

The city currently has a moratorium on mobile home park redevelopment through May 11.

The Association of Manufactured Home Owners recently held an informational meeting earlier this month to educate local manufactured or mobile home owners on Kenmore’s upcoming talks on affordable housing preservation.

AMHO held the meeting at the Northshore Fire Department in Kenmore and had to ask attendees to sit in the lobby as the room was quickly filled beyond capacity. More than 100 local mobile home owners attended the meeting to learn about how to participate in the city Planning Commission’s discussions on affordable housing.

Currently, the city maintains a moratorium on mobile home park redevelopment. The moratorium, which lasts until May, 11, restricts any mobile home redevelopment.

Lauri Anderson, Kenmore’s senior planner, attended the meeting and said the city has no current protections for mobile home parks. The moratorium is meant to temporarily prevent any redevelopment proposals until the commission can make recommendations to city council on potential regulations.

According to the city, the commission is considering multiple options and want to hear from local mobile home owners at upcoming meetings.

Anderson addressed the issue at Tuesday’s City Council meeting, after the Reporter’s deadline. The city has arranged for a Spanish interpreter to attend the planning commission meeting on Jan. 30.

Anderson added that the city will notify mobile home park residents about future meetings through letters. The letters will include a Spanish translation.

AMHO encouraged communities to form homeowners associations to keep a balanced relationship with the land owners.

AMHO is a state nonprofit organization that aims to educate and preserve mobile home communities.

More in News

Tips for staying safe around Washington wildlife

In the wake of a deadly cougar attack near North Bend here’s some tips on staying safe.

Roza Irrigation District manager Scott Revell inspects a water gauge in the lower Yakima Valley. If a drought pump is installed in Kachess Lake it would mean a more reliable source of water for crops in the valley. Aaron Kunkler/Staff photo
Puget Sound residents worried about Kachess Lake plan

A pump to supply much-needed water to Eastern Washington during droughts could affect recreation.

Candidates file for state, federal office

Twenty-nine candidates are challenging incumbent U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell.

Bastyr University appoints Harlan Patterson as new president

Patterson stepped into the office as interim president following Dr. Powell’s leave last July.

This petroleum refinery in Anacortes is run by Shell, one of the defendants in the suit brought by King County. Photo by Walter Siegmund/Wikipedia Commons
Can King County win its lawsuit against Big Oil?

Legal experts think past lawsuits against the tobacco industry increase the odds of a favorable outcome.

Governor and Secretary of State to fund statewide prepaid ballot postage

King County, however, won’t get any of that money.

Low numbers of Lake Sammamish kokanee raise fears of extinction

Only 19 kokanee salmon returned to spawn this year.

Eastside environmentalists turn up the heat on climate change

Residents are concerned about King County not meeting its greenhouse gas emissions targets.

Foster care homes needed as more children affected by opioid crisis

May is national Foster Care Awareness Month.

Most Read