McMenamins in Bothell shuts down pool for safety issue

McMenamins Pool Manager Debra Shelton said her department was already aware of the problem and planning on closing the pool independently. The thick fog created a situation where lifeguards were unable to clearly see the pool.

The pool at McMenamins Anderson School in Bothell is closed until further notice while they install additional ventilation to reduce a thick fog which prompted the pool’s closure earlier this month.

During a Jan. 4 inspection by the King County Public Health Department related to three cases of minor food poisoning, an inspector noticed a thick fog over the pool.

McMenamins Pool Manager Debra Shelton said her department was already aware of the problem and planning on closing the pool independently. The thick fog created a situation where lifeguards were unable to clearly see the pool.

“We’re working with the Health Department to take care of the fog that sets up in our pool area,” she said. “We’re working on a very prompt solution, I know the engineer has already been in.”

The open air skylights in the pool chambers, designed to keep the room from becoming too humid, were drawing in cooler winter air which mixed with the pool’s 90 degree water to create a fog, Shelton said.

“The water is perfect, the chemicals are perfect, it’s just the fog that’s created by our open air skylights,” she said. “We just need better ventilation to get the steam out of there.”

The pool could be reopened in a few weeks, though no specific date was available.

Residents can check the Anderson School website for updates.

When McMenamins purchased the property, they agreed to let Bothell residents use the pool free of charge.

The Health Department was on site Jan. 4 after they received a food-borne illness complaint involving three of four people who ate burgers there on Dec. 29 coming down with minor food poisoning.

An inspection report found several minor foodservice health code violations involving the handling of raw food and hand washing sinks, but not enough to shut down any restaurants.

A follow up inspection is scheduled for next week to ensure the restaurant is following proper health code procedure.

More in News

An example of a fish culvert that prevents fish from migrating through it. Creative commons
Fish culverts ruling will increase price tag for the state

The state will be on the line for $3.7 billion for fish culvert replacements.

Kenmore and Kirkland police collaborate to arrest shooting suspect

Kirkland and Kenmore police arrested a suspect in a non-injury shooting case that occurred on July 7

SAATWA Board President Aseem Chipalkatti gives an opening speech to those who were in attendance Sunday afternoon. Hanson Lee/staff photo.
South Asian organizations look to take political action and advocacy to the next level

SAATWA and SAPAC are planning to push for political involvement and the political values of Washington’s South Asian community.

Kenmore opens new Moorlands Park

The project features new ballfield renovations, restrooms, a picnic shelter and play area upgrade.

Rabid bat found near Woodinville

County health officials urge anyone who may have been exposed to the bat to seek treatment.

Barrier that protects Eastside water to be repaired

The barrier protects a pipeline that delivers water to various Eastside cities and Seattle.

‘Red, White and Bothell’: City celebrates Fourth of July

The traditional Freedom Festival Parade ran down a revitalized Main Street.

Safe consumption part 3: The opposite of addiction

Final episode of our three-part series on controversial supervised consumption sites

The many hurdles from farm to table

From environmental regulations to expensive land, local farmers have a lot on their plate

Most Read