Northshore School District announces election returns

This week, Bothell and Kenmore residents voted on two Northshore School District levies and one bond addressing increasing enrollment numbers.

Early returns from the election came in Tuesday evening. All results are according to King County which included results from Snohomish County.

Proposition 1 received 20,760 total votes, passing with 12,497 “yes” votes or 60.2 percent and 8,263 “no” votes or 39.8 percent.

According to the school district, Prop. 1, the Renewal Educational Programs & Operations Levy, intends to maintain high-quality academics and address the needs of students who require additional resources and interventions.

The levy also funds extracurricular activities, like music, clubs, sports and drama. It replaces the current educational programs and operations levy, which expires this year.

The cost of Prop. 1 is about $234 million over four years.

District officials anticipate that the tax rate to go down to $1.82 per $1,000 assessed value, compared to the $1.93 per $1,000 in 2017.

Prop. 2, the Capital Projects Bond, received 20,776 total votes with 12,379 “yes” votes or 59.58 percent and 8,397 or 40.42 percent. The proposition currently fails to pass because it needs a 60 percent majority, but ballots are still being counted.

Prop. 2 intends to add capacity to schools, resolving issues revolving around overcrowding while simultaneously addressing equity problems.

It is a $275 million capital bond set to last for four years. The new estimated tax rate would be $1.59 per $1,000 assessed value. The current tax rate is $1.78 per $1,000 per assessed value.

Safety and security updates would also come with the passage of the proposition, as well as a new K-5 school, a new 30-classroom flexible use building stationed at the Skyview Middle/Canyon Creek Elementary campus and a performing arts building at Inglemoor High School. Additional building repairs and more outdoor spaces are included among the potential bond projects.

Prop. 3, the Renewal Technology Levy, received 20,414 total votes, passing with 12,296 “yes” votes or 60.23 percent and 8,118 “no” votes or 39.77 percent.

Prop. 3 provides increased technological access to students and seeks to give teachers and parents the ability to provide their input.

District-to-family communications is also funded. This levy, which costs $62 million, increases the tax rate from $0.30 per $1,000 assessed value to $0.48 per $1,000.

It replaces the current technology levy, which expires this year.

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