NSD puts three measures on February 2018 ballot

  • Tuesday, November 7, 2017 3:46pm
  • News

Northshore School District’s board of directors voted unanimously at the Oct. 23 meeting to add three measures to the Feb. 13, 2018 ballot.

The capital projects bond measure addresses growth, overcrowding and equity through construction of new facilities, while the renewal of two levies allows the district to continue buildings its academic program for students and increase student access to technology.

Proposition 1: Renewal of the Education Programs & Operations Levy will provide $234 million over the next four years. The levy provides nearly 20 percent of the district’s annual budget for educational programs, services and daily operations. Levy dollars fund special education and transportation costs not provided for by the state and help learners who need additional resources including interventions and advanced-learning options. The levy also funds extra-curricular activities including music, drama, sports and clubs. This levy replaces the current levy that expires in 2018.

Proposition 2: Capital Projects Bond includes $275 million in projects to provide students space for success. Additional schools and facilities will ease overcrowding and provide equity across the district. Projects include:

  • Safety and security upgrades at every NSD school
  • A new K-5 school at a district-owned site near Maltby
  • The addition of 30 classrooms at the Skyview Middle School and Canyon Creek Elementary campus
  • A performing arts and instructional building at Inglemoor High School
  • Building improvement projects throughout the district

Proposition 3: Renewal of the Tech Levy for $62 million will put technology in the hands of every student, with an emphasis on being safe and responsible digital citizens. The levy accomplishes the goal of a one-to-one student-to-device ratio. It will also fund important supports, including teacher training and parental input, to make the strategy successful. This levy replaces the current tech levy that expires in 2018.

“Our district is growing and these measures will help ease overcrowding and meet the educational needs of our students, as well as ensure that all students have the technology they need for success,” said Superintendent Michelle Reid in a district press release. “While this is an unusual time in K-12 education funding, we’ve built a decades-long trust throughout our district because of our ability to be good stewards of tax dollars.”

With input from the community, the release states that the district has developed a plan to shape the future of schools in one of the fastest growing regions in the United States. In the past six years, 2,000 new students have joined the district and projections show an additional increase of 1,700 in the next six years. Two task forces and an advisory committee — made up of parents, community members and district staff — have worked for the past two years to develop plans that will address this growth and meet the needs of the district into the future.

For more information about the bond or levies to schedule a presentation, visit www.nsd.org/2018bondlevies, email bondlevy@nsd.org or call (425) 408-7670.

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