Palumbo running for senate to be a new voice | Vote 2016

Guy Palumbo is running for the 1st District Senate seat left vacant after long-time state Sen. Rosemary McAuliffe decided not to run in November's election.

Guy Palumbo is running for the 1st District Senate seat left vacant after long-time state Sen. Rosemary McAuliffe decided not to run in November’s election.

Palumbo said a new voice in Olympia is needed to end partisan gridlock on several important issues, including transportation improvements and education funding.

“Olympia is broken,” he said. “We need to have a responsible change.”

Palumbo was elected as a Fire Commissioner for Snohomish County Fire District 7 in 2013. He was also appointed to the county planning commission in 2011 and has served as the Chair since 2014 and presided over last year’s county Comprehensive Plan update.

He has also served on the Board of Directors for the local nonprofit “OneBothell” and owns Roscoe’s Ranch, which is a dog boarding business, and has worked for Amazon.

This combination of public and private experience best qualifies him to serve as a state senator, he said.

His first priority would be to find a better way to manage growth in the district, he said, particularly in the North Creek area which has seen rapid expansion recently.

He hopes to find federal and surplus budget money to fund transportation improvement and maintenance programs in the district.

A slew of community groups focused on environmental preservation is also a sign that area governments aren’t doing enough to protect open spaces, he said.

Funding education in line with the McCleary decision is also high on his list of priorities, but he said both sides of the aisle need to be more pragmatic.

“I think both sides are unrealistic,” he said.

He said while many Republicans are busy trying to find a way to overturn the McCleary decision, this won’t happen.

And while many Democrats are trying to pass funding measures which would create an income or capital gains tax, Palumbo said these likely won’t pass a state-wide vote.

“Income tax isn’t going to happen, raising the sales tax disproportionately hurts poor people,” he said.

Instead, he hopes to close tax loopholes for corporations and implement taxes on the sales of stocks and bonds.

But finding middle ground in the Senate is equally important in trying to end the deadlock which has plagued politics recently, he said.

“Olympia is simply not providing the solutions that our small businesses and our families want,” he said.

More in News

President’s emergency declaration sparks immediate legal backlash

Attorney General Bob Ferguson said his team will sue the White House if federal funds originally intended for Washington state are interrupted.

Bill targets sexual health curriculum in Washington schools

Senate Bill 5395 is co-sponsored by 17 Democratic representatives and introduced by Sen. Claire Wilson, D-Federal Way.

According to King County’s Mental Illness and Drug Dependency (MIDD) annual report, Seattle had the highest rate of people using services at 36 percent of the total, followed by 31 percent from South King County, 18 percent from the greater Eastside, and 7 percent from north county including Shoreline.
Study shows King County’s treatment funding is making progress

A document on the county’s .1 percent health sales tax was accepted Wednesday by the county council.

Children’s play area at Seadrunar. Photo by Lauren Davis via Facebook
Seedy side of Seadrunar: Drug rehab center accused of neglect, exploitation

Public records reveal that Seattle facility was accused of neglecting children and clients in its care.

Russell Wilson and Ciara spoke Friday at the Tukwila Library to Foster students and other attendees as their Why Not You Foundation joined forces with the King County Library System and JPMorgan Chase to launch the DREAM BIG: Anything is Possible campaign. Photo by Kayse Angel
Russell Wilson and Ciara launch DREAM BIG campaign

Partnership with King County libraries dovetails with scholarship program for local students.

David Baker. Photo courtesy of city of Kenmore
Kenmore’s Baker continues regional service on board for Sound Cities Association

Baker has served on the Kenmore City Council for 14 years.

Southbound traffic backs up as northbound drivers cruise on with ease on the Highway 99 viaduct on Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
WSDOT hopes ‘Viadoom’ habits continue

The department credits commuters with adapting to the closure and mitigating impacts.

Somali community faces SeaTac displacement

Proposed redevelopment threatens the heart of the Somali business community.

Snow delays 228th Avenue construction project in Bothell

Work began on Jan. 31, but construction was delayed due to inclement weather and conditions.

Most Read