Snohomish County’s Kendee Yamaguchi selected for WSCRC’s Board of Directors

  • Friday, February 9, 2018 11:00am
  • News

On Thursday, Feb. 8, the Snohomish County Executive’s Office and the Washington State China Relations Council announced the confirmation of executive director Kendee Yamaguchi to the WSCRC Board of Directors.

Yamaguchi is the top trade and economic development adviser in Snohomish County and has been serving as executive director for over two years. WSCRC is a leading statewide organization dedicated to establishing a stronger relationship and increased trade with China.

“Kendee is a smart leader with a list of impressive federal and state accomplishments,” Snohomish County executive Dave Somers said in a press release. “She has been working hard to advance Snohomish County’s visibility in the Pacific Rim to open up opportunities for our local businesses, governments and communities. Her role on WSCRC’s board will be instrumental in strengthening our relationship with one of our top trading partners, China. We value our partnership with the Washington State China Relations Council and plan to collaborate closely with them in advancing our shared interests.”

“As a global-minded strategic thinker, Kendee Yamaguchi’s business savvy and seasoned policymaking experience at the national, state, county and city levels will be a critical leadership asset in charting the future direction of WSCRC and the council’s collaboration with Snohomish County,” WSCRC president Mercy Kuo said in a press release.

“Strengthening Snohomish County and the region’s existing relationships with China, one of our state’s top trading partners, is ever more important given how connected our world has become,” Yamaguchi said in a press release. “China is an important part of our future, and it is vital for us to ensure their government leaders, businesses, and investors know that we are open for business and welcome them.”

As a member of the WSCRC Board of Directors, Yamaguchi will contribute to the region’s economic vitality and cultural diversity by working with board members to advocate for increased trade and other economic opportunities.

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