UW Bothell Dean Elaine Scott named 2015 Fulbright Scholar

Elaine Scott, Ph.D., Dean of the University of Washington Bothell’s School of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, has received a Fulbright award. As a Fulbright Senior Specialist, Scott will travel to the University of New England in Australia this summer where she will assist in developing curriculum, building research links and establishing ongoing cooperation between the United States and Australia.

  • Monday, March 30, 2015 1:39pm
  • News

UW Bothell Dean Elaine Scott.

Elaine Scott, Ph.D., Dean of the University of Washington Bothell’s School of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, has received a Fulbright award. As a Fulbright Senior Specialist, Scott will travel to the University of New England in Australia this summer where she will assist in developing curriculum, building research links and establishing ongoing cooperation between the United States and Australia.

Scott says she looks forward to the opportunity to work with people from different disciplines and perspectives at the University of New England, Australia to promote STEM education and research. “This will be an exciting opportunity to compare issues from diverse perspectives inherent in forming an integrated STEM education unit,” she said. “This experience will facilitate deeper understanding and respect of these varying perspectives, leading to positive and effective outcomes.”

Scott joined UW Bothell in 2012 as director of the Science and Technology Program. Since then, the university has seen its most rapid recent growth in STEM fields. She was named dean of the School of STEM in 2013 and in the fall of 2014, she moved the school into new the $68-million state of the art Discovery Hall science and academic building, which opened in the fall of 2014.

Under Scott’s leadership, the School of STEM has quickly grown in academic offerings with 14 degree programs. It has also added faculty to keep pace with the growing number of students. More than 40 percent of students with declared majors are in STEM and high-demand healthcare fields. The School of STEM is among the top three producers of computer science graduates in the state of Washington.

Scott continues to work with her faculty and staff to foster an inclusive culture and encourage more students from underserved communities to consider STEM. Half of STEM students are from diverse backgrounds and one-third are the first in their families to attend college. Women make up 40 percent of STEM faculty, far outpacing the national average.

Scott was previously professor and director of engineering programs at Seattle Pacific University. She holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree in agricultural engineering from the University of California, Davis. She also holds doctoral degrees in agricultural engineering and mechanical engineering from Michigan State University.

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