UW Bothell enrollment numbers grow for 11th consecutive year

  • Tuesday, November 22, 2016 7:04am
  • News

UW Bothell - Contributed art

The University of Washington Bothell’s enrollment numbers continue to rise for the 11th year in a row since it began accepting students in 2006, according to university officials.

For the 2016-2017 academic year, the University reports 820 new first-year students and 858 new transfer students. Of the total student population of 5,735, nine-out-of-10 are from the state of Washington. More than 90 percent of first-year students come from two counties, King (62 percent) and Snohomish (30 percent).

University officials also state that 49 percent of the incoming first-year and 39 percent of incoming transfer students are the first in their family to go to college. Just over a third of all undergraduates are eligible for Pell grants, the federal aid that helps low-income students meet some of their expenses.

UW Bothell Chancellor Wolf Yeigh said the school’s leading edge educational experience and proven record for return on investment attracts a diverse pool of students each year who are in search of ways to transform their lives and change the world.

“Half of our students graduate with zero debt, and research shows our graduates earn more one year out than those of any other four-year public institution in the state,” Yeigh said. “The return on investment for industry and community partners is equally important, with undergraduate and graduate students conducting groundbreaking research and engaging in community-based learning projects that are improving lives of citizens throughout the region and across the globe.”

Of first-year students, 53 percent are male and 47 percent female. The top feeder high schools in order are Henry M. Jackson and Inglemoor, followed by Bothell, Lynnwood and Shorewood all tied for third.

The top feeder two- and four-year colleges are Bellevue, Cascadia, Edmonds, Everett and Shoreline.

Nearly a quarter of students in the University’s incoming first-year class of 2020 are counted among the traditional definition of underrepresented minority groups: 13 percent Hispanic or Latino, 10 percent African American, less than 1 percent Native American and less than 1 percent Hawaiian/Pacific Islander. The University’s diverse population also includes 35 percent Asian and 7 percent students who identify as two or more races.

Of all undergraduates, students from traditionally underrepresented ethnic groups remains constant at 20 percent. International students make up 10 percent of the undergrads and 15 percent of the University’s 622 graduates students. A total of 281 students are U.S. military veterans or spouses or children of veterans eligible for benefits.

This is the largest class for the University, which was founded in 1990 and opened classes on the new campus in 2000 for transfer students.

Nearly a third of all students have declared a major in the field of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and 20 percent of women with majors are in the STEM field. In comparison, only 12 percent of the bachelor’s awarded in 2014 nationally went to women in science and engineering, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.

Recently, the University has been highly ranked or rated by Reuters and the Wall Street Journal for innovation and graduate success. UW Bothell has been included in The Princeton Review’s “Best in the West” and Washington Monthly’s “Best Bang for the Buck.”

Students found additional academic choices this year: a full degree major in gender, women and sexuality studies (GWSS), a dual campus doctor of pharmacy MBA, a graduate certificate in digital teaching and learning, plus new minors in economics, health studies, health education promotion, neuroscience and chemistry. Also new since spring quarter in the School of Educational Studies is a Bachelor of Arts in educational studies with an option for K-8 teacher certification.

UW Bothell now offers 46 degrees, 21 minors and nine certificates and continues to increase course offerings for area undergraduate and graduate students spanning downtown Seattle to Everett.

For more information on UW Bothell, visit www.uwb.edu.

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