Wastemobile ends 2017 household hazardous waste collection season in Bothell, Oct. 20-22

  • Monday, October 9, 2017 9:59am
  • News

Courtesy of King County

The Wastemobile, a traveling household hazardous waste collection service in King County, wraps up its 2017 season with a final collection event in Bothell, Oct. 20-22.

The Wastemobile will be in the parking lot of the Seattle Times building, 19200 120th Ave. NE, Bothell, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

Residents can drop off household hazardous waste items including pesticides, oil-based paints, automotive products (oil, antifreeze, lamps, etc.), fluorescent bulbs/tubes and other items without a charge. The service is pre-paid through garbage and sewer utility fees.

Created in 1989, the Wastemobile was the first traveling hazardous waste disposal program in the nation. It is operated by the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program and goes throughout King County from the spring through fall.

Residents help protect the environment and public health by safely disposing of the hazardous materials and keeping them out of drains and landfills. Since first hitting the road, the Wastemobile has collected more than 17,000 tons of hazardous household waste from more than 466,000 customers.

The Wastemobile provides free reusable products to the public, such as oil-based paint, stain and primer, plus wood care and cleaning products. These products are subject to availability, and residents must sign a release form prior to receiving the materials.

For more information about disposal, including acceptable materials and quantity limits, call the Hazards Line at 206-296-4692, Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., except holidays. Recorded information is available after hours, or by visiting the Wastemobile website.

The Wastemobile is one of the services provided by the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program through a partnership of more than 40 city, county and tribal governments working together in King County to reduce threats posed from hazardous materials and wastes.

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