Wastemobile household hazardous waste collection comes to Bothell, Sept. 15-17

  • Tuesday, September 5, 2017 8:30am
  • News

The Wastemobile, a traveling household hazardous waste collection service in King County, continues its 2017 season with a collection event in Covington, Sept. 8-10 followed by an event in Bothell, Sept. 15-17.

The Wastemobile will be in the parking lot of Kent Fire Station No. 75, 15635 SE 272nd St., Covington, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

The Wastemobile then travels to Bothell for a household hazardous waste collection event. The Wastemobile will be in the parking lot of the Seattle Times building, 19200 120th Ave. NE, Bothell.

Residents can drop off household hazardous waste items including pesticides, oil-based paints, automotive products (oil, antifreeze, lamps, etc.), fluorescent bulbs/tubes and other items without a charge. The service is pre-paid through garbage and sewer utility fees.

About the Wastemobile

Created in 1989, the Wastemobile was the first traveling hazardous waste disposal program in the nation. It is operated by the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program and goes throughout King County from the spring through fall.

Residents help protect the environment and public health by safely disposing of the hazardous materials and keeping them out of drains and landfills. Since first hitting the road, the Wastemobile has collected more than 17,000 tons of hazardous household waste from more than 466,000 customers.

The Wastemobile provides free reusable products to the public, such as oil-based paint, stain and primer, plus wood care and cleaning products. These products are subject to availability, and residents must sign a release form prior to receiving the materials.

More disposal solutions: Visit the permanent collection site

For south King County residents, the Auburn Wastemobile is a convenient alternative for disposing of household hazardous waste. It is located in the northwest parking lot of The Outlet Collection, 1101 Outlet Collection Dr., SW, next to the loading dock and Nordstrom Rack.

Qualifying businesses can also use the no-cost disposal services. Call 206-263-8899 or find details at hazwastehelp.org.

For more information

For more information about disposal, including acceptable materials and quantity limits, call the Hazards Line at 206-296-4692, Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., except holidays. Recorded information is available after hours, or by visiting the Wastemobile website.

The Wastemobile is one of the services provided by the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program through a partnership of more than 40 city, county and tribal governments working together in King County to reduce threats posed from hazardous materials and wastes.

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