Wyman endorses passage of amended Washington Voting Rights Act

The act would provide Washington citizens with a means to legally contest elections that exhibit disparities between voters in protected classes and other voters.

Kim Wyman. Courtesy of Secretary of State office

Kim Wyman. Courtesy of Secretary of State office

Washingtonians should see the Voting Rights Act pass the Legislature this session.

This from Secretary of State Kim Wyman, Washington’s chief elections officer.

“The idea of a Voting Rights Act in Washington has been debated for a number of years, and with the amendments adopted by the House and Senate, it is now time to enact it into law,” Wyman said in a press release. “Local jurisdictions and citizens across our state need a path to address issues of underrepresentation in their communities without having to go through the courts to get relief.”

According to the press release, the Federal Voting Rights Act of 1965 prohibits discrimination in elections and the Washington Voting Rights Act would provide Washington citizens with a means to legally contest elections that exhibit disparities between voters in protected classes and other voters. If the assertions are found to be valid, a court could require the subdivision to redistrict or create a district-based election system. Jurisdictions would also have the authority to revise districts without court intervention.

“The Legislature is now one step closer to bringing the Washington Voting Rights Act to the governor’s desk for signature, and I want to commend Sen. Saldana and Rep. Gregerson for their leadership on this important issue,” Wyman said in the release.

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