Opinion

Get back on track in the New Year with a healthier diet, lifestyle | Gustafson

Making New Year's resolution is a time-honored, albeit tiring, custom. It basically forces you to admit you were wrong to indulge in all these wonderful dinner parties and treats over the holidays, and that you must now atone for your bad deeds. Not much fun in that, is there?

Still, the scale doesn't lie and neither do your cloths that must have shrunken mysteriously while you were out having a blast. So, what can you do other than change your "evil" ways?

First of all, there is no point in chastising yourself for what's already happened. You've gained a few pounds and feel uncomfortable about it. But it's not the end of the world. In all likelihood, you've been here before, perhaps several times. Maybe you remember how you managed to turn things around the last time, and chances are it will work for you again.

On the other hand, it would be nice, and also healthier, if you could avoid the notorious yo-yo effects of your weight control efforts once and for all.

So, before you look for the next fad diet that promises to do the trick in no time and without a struggle, imagine yourself as the person you truly want to be – one that isn't plagued by regrets and doesn't need self-flagellation because he or she knows exactly what a healthy body requires and looks like.

The fact is that it doesn't matter what kind of weight loss method you choose. All you really have to focus on is that your food intake is less than what you burn off. A 500 calories deficit per day will allow you to shed about a pound a week. Replace the junk with more nutritious foods, add a regular exercise regimen and you are on your way.

Beyond that, you just have to be a little patient with yourself. Remember that changing your eating and lifestyle habits puts you in a stage of transition, meaning that you are in an especially vulnerable spot. It will take some time to get your body used to a new routine. Temptations are still rampant after the holidays, and feeling deprived or punished doesn't help you stay the course.

Believe it or not, it also matters greatly what you are communicating to your metabolism: Is the change in your behavior for real and will it last, or is it short-lived and not worth the trouble? Quick-fix diet programs are notorious for messing up people's metabolism for this very reason – they are too short-termed for your system to catch up.

Make it work for you

Also keep in mind that no commercially available weight loss plan is just designed for you. That means you are basically asked to follow other people's recommendations based on their experiences. But in reality, those may or may not apply to you.

A better way is to trust in your body's wisdom. Listen to it and how it signals its needs to you. For instance, you may have the urge to snack, but you may also ask yourself, am I really hungry? Or, what healthier food would satisfy my desire for something sweet or salty just as much and without downside effects?

Knowing your weaknesses, you can also avoid setting yourself up for failure, for example by circumventing certain aisles in the supermarket or by stocking up on healthy items only. Examine your daily routines and habits, and question which ones are important and which ones have crept in over time without much notice.

Make sure you understand that choosing a healthier diet and lifestyle is not something you just do in one step. It is an ongoing process where you – and only you – set priorities and values for yourself and pursue them in a manner that is right for you.

Substitute the good for the bad

Once you have identified what got you off course in the first place, you can take stock and make changes – if necessary one or two at a time. Don't overwhelm yourself with a lot of dos and don'ts. Be realistic. Even your less-than-perfect habits once materialized for a reason.

If other components in your life can't be altered – say, you travel a great deal and are forced to eat out a lot, or you can't find appropriate outlets for exercising – you may have to be at bit creative to keep yourself on the right path. Identify new opportunities and remove as many obstacles as you can.

In any case, always stay focused on the larger picture and go about your goals with sufficient determination but also with the necessary patience and forgiveness.

Happy New Year.

Timi Gustafson R.D. is a registered dietitian, newspaper columnist, blogger and author of the book "The Healthy Diner – How to Eat Right and Still Have Fun"®, which is available on her blog and at amazon.com.  For more articles on nutrition, health and lifestyle, visit her blog, "Food and Health with Timi Gustafson R.D." (www.timigustafson.com). You can follow Timi on Twitter, on Facebook,Google+ and on Pinterest.

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