EKOS Corporation partnership receives funding for catheter technology

  • Friday, September 12, 2008 1:41pm
  • Business

Washington Technology Center has awarded $30,000 in Research and Technology Development funding based on a proposal from University of Washington in collaboration with EKOS Corporation.

EKOS Corporation, a Bothell-based medical-device company, is teamed with the University of Washington Department of Chemical Engineering to improve the company’s proprietary catheter-based drug-delivery system.

UW will receive $30,000 in Phase I Research and Technology Development funding from Washington Technology Center and $6,000 from EKOS for the project titled “Development of an algorithm to accurately predict ‘end of therapy’ in ultrasound-facilitated Thrombolysis.”

Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) is a therapy for patients with vascular diseases such as deep-vein thrombosis. However, current use of CDT is associated with high costs. These costs are due to technology limitations that result in doctors prescribing larger than necessary drug dosages and longer durations of therapy.

In this Phase I project, the collaborative team of EKOS and UW assistant professor Hong Shen plan to analyze patient data to develop an algorithm that will better predict the end of CDT therapy. Follow-on projects will involve the development and launch of the resulting software upgrade. EKOS plans to add this new technology to its current product line, potentially making CDT a more attractive and economical treatment option for doctors and patients.

Washington Technology Center competitively awards around $1 million in state funding annually as part of the Research and Technology Development program. State funding enables collaboration between companies and nonprofit research institutions on technology projects that show strong potential for commercializing products and creating jobs. Since 1996, the state has funded 324 Research and Technology Development projects.

“Investing in our communities and businesses through economic development really does enhance people’s lives and our business climate. This research and development funding to EKOS is geared to develop ways to lower costs of essential medical treatment for those with vascular problems. To these people and their families, this work quite possibly can make a world of difference. These continued funding grants are targeted investments that help a lot of people,” said state Sen. Rosemary McAuliffe (D-Bothell).

“This is great news for the research industry in the Bothell area,” said state Rep. Al O’Brien (D-Mountlake Terrace). “I’m very happy to hear about the partnership, and I hope that there are many more like it.”


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