Gov. Gregoire honors Amgen with ‘Commute Smart Award’

Array

  • Friday, September 19, 2008 9:32am
  • Business

Washington employers with exceptional employee transportation programs were honored — including Bothell’s Amgen, Inc. — with the “Governor’s Commute Smart Award” during a recent luncheon of the Washington State Department of Transportation’s Public Transportation Conference and Expo in Kennewick. The awards were presented by Washington Transportation Secretary Paula Hammond.

In all, 25 companies were honored in 13 categories. The awards categories range from the Champion Award, honoring consistent, time-proven leadership in commute trip reduction, to the Site Challenges Award, recognizing employers achieving program success despite limited transit service or highly secure work sites.

One of this year’s Champion Awards was presented to Amgen, Inc. a biotechnology company located in Bothell. Amgen has demonstrated its commitment to helping reduce traffic congestion and air pollution with progressive thinking and offering multiple ways to participate. At the Bothell work site, 37 percent of the employees commute to work using a commute alternative and at their Helix site that number is an impressive 68 percent. Amgen currently has 26 vanpools coming to their work sites from King and Snohomish counties, Vashon Island and Kitsap County. In addition, 80 Amgen staff members use carpools to get to work. Much of their success can be attributed to the support of the site’s leadership.

“Congratulations to this year’s award winners, who have shown their commitment to encouraging employees to reduce drive alone commuting,” said Gov. Chris Gregoire. “These best practices are shining examples to both public and private sector organizations and I am glad they will be shared throughout the state.”

The Governor’s Commute Smart Awards recognize employers who have model programs that encourage positive change in their employees’ commuting habits and reduce drive-alone commuting. Washington’s Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) Task Force (now the CTR Board) started the awards program in 1998. The Washington State Department of Transportation solicited nominations and selected this year’s winners.

“Encouraging and promoting multiple travel options for commuters, reduces congestion and results in greater efficiency for our transportation system,” said Secretary Hammond. “By delivering innovative, comprehensive programs that address employee transportation needs, every one of these companies has made an important contribution towards reaching that goal,” she said.

These nominated and award-winning employers are leaders in saving space on the road and reducing impacts from gasoline consumption. They serve as role models for the more than 800 employers in the state who implement CTR programs. For a complete list of the award winners, visit: www.wsdot.wa.gov/partners/commute/CommuteSmart.htm

Approximately 560,000 individuals are employed at work sites participating in the CTR program. Statewide, the program removes more than 26,000 vehicles from our roadways each weekday morning. That many cars parked in a line would almost stretch from Olympia to Everett. The program also removes more than 4,000 tons of air pollution and almost 86,000 tons of greenhouse gases from our air each year and saved its participants $23 million in fuel costs in 2007.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@bothell-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.bothell-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in Business

Images of dishes from Issaquah’s Umi Cafe posted on the SMORS page. (Photo courtesy of Kristen Ho)
Facebook page promotes minority-owned restaurants across Puget Sound region

Miya Nazzaro used to be a member of Facebook pages that were… Continue reading

The Moe Vegan food truck serves meals at the city of Kent’s annual Community Thanksgiving Dinner on Nov. 21, 2020. Sound Publishing file photo
King County fire marshals offer regulatory relief to food trucks

39 fire authorities have reportedly agreed to standardize fire codes and inspections.

Snehal Patel, Global Head of Cell Therapy Manufacturing at Bristol Myers Squibb, stand outside the facility on Monday, March 29, 2021 in Bothell, Washington. A Bristol Myers Squibb facility in Bothell is one of four facilities in the United States where the company supercharges a person's T-cells to better fight blood cancers. The facility uses a virus  -- a viral delivery system -- to add punch to an individual's T-cells. The T-cells are then returned to the person better-equipped to destroy cancer cells.  (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Cancer patients nationwide send their blood cells to Bothell

At a Bristol Myers Squibb lab, the cells are altered and returned to patients fighting non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Cash Cards Unlimited partners, left: Nick Nugwynne, right: Cassius Marsh (photo credit: Cash Cards Unlimited)
Former Seahawks player Cassius Marsh cashes in on trading cards

Marsh and his friend open physical and online trading card store as collectibles boom amid pandemic.

Teaser
First large-scale, human composting facility in the world will open in Auburn

“It’s what nature meant us to do. We just do it faster.”

Whole Foods grocery store entrance (Shutterstock)
King County considers grocery store worker hazard pay for those in unincorporated areas

The King County Metropolitan Council will vote during its next meeting on… Continue reading

Screenshot
WA Democrats consider new tax on billionaires

Plan could raise $5 billion from fewer than 100 taxpayers. Detractors fear it could drive Washington’s wealthiest out of state.

Last summer, people took advantage of the outdoor dining along First Avenue between Gowe and Titus streets in downtown Kent. In Phase 2 of the governor’s reopening plan, which was announced Jan. 28, restaurants can reopen at a maximum 25% capacity and a limit of six people per table. Photo courtesy of Kent Downtown Partnership
Restaurant reprieve: State to relax some indoor restrictions

On Monday, area restaurants and certain entertainment venues may resume indoor service, the governor said.

Stock photo
State Senate passes $1.7 billion in unemployment insurance tax relief

Targets relief to the most affected businesses; helps low-wage workers by raising their benefits

Jason Wilson is a James Beard Award-winning chef and owner of The Lakehouse in Bellevue. Courtesy photo
James Beard Award winner wants to cook with you – virtually

Chef Jason Wilson can give customers an interactive dining experience in their own homes.

2021 Chevrolet Blazer. Courtesy photo
Car review: 2021 Chevrolet Blazer

By Larry Lark, contributor When it comes to certain car models they… Continue reading

2021 Lexus RX 350L. Courtesy photo
Car review: 2021 Lexus RX 350L

By Larry Lark, contributor It’s always a good day when a Lexus… Continue reading