Bothell’s Colossal Boss releases debut single since their name change. Photo courtesy of Colossal Boss

Bothell’s Colossal Boss releases debut single since their name change. Photo courtesy of Colossal Boss

Bothell’s Colossal Boss releases debut single, ‘Thinkin’ and Drinkin’’

This is the band’s first single since its name change.

Imagine a neighborhood tavern. Pool tables, dim lights, crushed peanut shells underfoot, TVs with football softly playing in the background, along with the occasional heavy stomping of a local rock band. Bothell’s Bert’s Tavern is the quintessential American bar.

It’s also the location of a professional music video.

Colossal Boss recently released their debut single, “Thinkin’ and Drinkin.’”

Recorded by Justin Armstrong at Studio X and Electrokitty Studio in Seattle, the song is a mixture of hard rock, classic rock, soul and “just a touch of country,” according to lead singer Steve Antonsen.

The band first formed in 2004 under the name Midstokke and released three albums. Now known as Colossal Boss, the band released its self-titled EP in 2015, but have now released their first single in November.

Colossal Boss is based in Bothell and made up of four near lifelong friends: Antonsen on vocals, Ted Norris on guitar, Fraser Midstokke on bass and Corey Olsen on drums.

The song, “Thinkin’ and Drinkin’,” tells the story of how one shy guy tries to muster up the courage to talk to the prettiest girl at the bar, and keeps “thinkin’ and drinkin’” about her.

“The idea for the song originally came from Ted and we worked together to write the music and lyrics,” Antonsen said.

The music video’s director, A.K. Romero, knew the band before working on this project, as he worked at Bert’s Tavern as a bartender.

“This really was the perfect place to film this video,” Antonsen said. “It set the mood perfectly.”

The band hopes the release of the music video will draw more listeners and hopes to go on tour soon. The band is planning on releasing two more music videos sometime next year.

“We decided to make this music video to get where our audience is—on their phones,” Olsen said. “Everyone’s listening to music on their phones and we want to break through that matrix.”

Colossal Boss can be found on Spotify, Amazon Music and YouTube. Their music video can be viewed on YouTube and on their website.


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Colossal Boss. From left: Ted Norris, Cory Olsen, Fraser Midstokke and Steve Antonsen. Photo courtesy of Colossal Boss Facebook page.

Colossal Boss. From left: Ted Norris, Cory Olsen, Fraser Midstokke and Steve Antonsen. Photo courtesy of Colossal Boss Facebook page.

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