Local librarian receives UW Distinguished Librarian Award

Local librarian receives UW Distinguished Librarian Award

Leslie Hurst works for the University of Washington Bothell Cascadia College Library.

  • Tuesday, May 15, 2018 8:30am
  • Life

Leslie Hurst of the University of Washington Bothell Cascadia College Library received the 2018 UW Distinguished Librarian award.

It’s the first time a librarian from the Bothell campus has won the award, which was established in 2008.

The award recognizes excellence in librarianship, especially as it benefits the academic community through innovative approaches to practice, research, teaching and learning.

Hurst supervises 13 librarians who routinely work with faculty to conduct information literacy workshops. They specifically teach new students how to use the library and generally how to conduct valid research. In the wider view, they teach how to recognize what is true and what is not.

“Evaluating information is something we hit hard in a lot of classes,” Hurst said in a press release. “It boils down to thinking critically. Don’t just consume anything and everything. Pause a moment and think about where it might be coming from, how they might be trying to influence you, how their perspective might be biased in certain ways.”

Hurst has been with the library nearly since the beginning. She started in 1999 when the library was a room in a business park building that UW Bothell temporarily occupied. She physically helped move some of the books to the library on campus. She worked at the library while earning a UW master’s degree in library and information science. Since 2004, Hurst has been head of teaching and learning at the library.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@bothell-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.bothell-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in Life

2021 Ford F-150 Platinum. Courtesy photo
Car review: 2021 Ford F-150 Platinum

By Larry Lark, contributor It’s always a call to action when a… Continue reading

The Cadillac CT4 is designed to appeal to a new generation of Cadillac buyers with its athletic design and astute driving dynamics. Courtesy photo
Car review: 2020 Cadillac CT4 Premium Luxury

By Larry Lark, contributor With apologies to Oldsmobile, “the 2020 CT4 Premium… Continue reading

2021 Mercedes E-350 luxury sedan. Courtesy photo
Car review: 2021 Mercedes E-350 luxury sedan

By Larry Lark, contributor Mercedes-Benz occupies rarified air in the automobile pantheon.… Continue reading

Courtesy photo/Artists Sunday
Artists Sunday, following Black Friday, puts out call for participants before Nov. 29

The movement has a website that offers a free directory of artists and art organizations that participate

courtesy photo
Students helping students, teachers during the pandemic with free tutoring program

Two Northshore School District students have launched a website for free tutoring classes for elementary school kids, with plans to expand

Jim Jamison and Stephanie Schisler wrote and illustrated “What Would I Be If I Couldn’t Be Me.” (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Bothell grandfather brews up a children’s book

Bothell’s Jim Jamison, owner of Foggy Noggin Brewing, wrote “What Would I Be If I Couldn’t Be Me?,” and his daughter, Stephanie Schisler, illustrated it.

File photo from September 2016, when hundreds participated in the Alzheimer’s Association’s Walk to End Alzheimer’s event at Redmond Town Center.
Eastside Walk to End Alzheimer’s Oct. 10

Similar to other walk events in the region, Alzheimer’s Association encourages registered users to walk in a location of their choice

Diya Garg, left, distributes Mighty Crayon recycles crayons and coloring books for Seattle students. Courtesy photo/Diya Garg.
Getting crayons to kids runs in the family

Eastside nonprofit Mighty Crayon is relaunched by younger sister of founder, repurposing used restaurant crayons

New physician at EvergreenHealth Canyon Park
New physician at EvergreenHealth Canyon Park

Learn more about the latest doctor on the scene

2020 Honda CR-V Hybrid. Courtesy photo
2020 Honda CR-V Hybrid | Car review

There’s a reason Honda’s CR-V has been America’s top-selling crossover vehicle over… Continue reading

2020 Ford Ranger SuperCrew Lariat. Courtesy photo
2020 Ford Ranger SuperCrew Lariat | Car review

Ford’s venerable compact Ranger pickup went away for a while. But it… Continue reading