State Supreme Court ruling highlights petition requirements

The deadline for initiative petitions to be submitted is 5 p.m. on July 6.

  • Friday, July 6, 2018 8:30am
  • Life

In a ruling issued Tuesday, the Supreme Court of the State of Washington outlined the responsibility of Secretary of State Kim Wyman to accept and evaluate initiative and referendum petitions.

The deadline for initiative petitions to be submitted to the Office of the Secretary of State is 5 p.m. July 6. If an initiative petition contains at least 259,622 registered voters’ signatures and meets the statutory requirements, the initiative will be placed on the November General Election ballot.

The Office of the Secretary of State has the authority defined in RCW 29A.72.170 for accepting or rejecting initiative petitions.

Under that statute, the Secretary of State may reject petitions that do not:

  • Contain certain language required by statute, including a warning, an oath, and a place for each petitioner to provide required information;
  • Bear 259,622 or more registered voters’ signatures, which are subject to verification; or
  • Meet the statutory deadline for filing with the Secretary of State.

“As Secretary of State, it is my duty to fairly and impartially evaluate all petitions so Washington voters can fully exercise their Constitutional rights,” Wyman said in a press release. “State law clearly defines the authority my office has for accepting or rejecting petitions. We are diligent in making sure those requirements are met. That’s our responsibility to every Washingtonian.”

Washington’s Office of Secretary of State oversees a number of areas within state government, including managing state elections, registering corporations and charities, and governing the use of the state flag and state seal.

The office also manages the State Archives and the State Library, documents extraordinary stories in Washington’s history through Legacy Washington, oversees the Combined Fund Drive for charitable giving by state employees, and administers the state’s Address Confidentiality Program to help protect survivors of crime.

More in Life

Leota Middle School Science Olympiad Club members earn medals at Southwest Regional Tournament

The Science Olympiad Club went to the regional tournament with three teams comprised of 36 Leota students.

Sound Transit seeks volunteers to serve on agency oversight panel

Opportunity to serve on the Sound Transit Citizen Oversight Panel representing Pierce County or Snohomish County.

Srebnik receives McMaster award from Kenmore Heritage Society

Srebnik has participated in Kenmore’s development since the mid-1990s.

PopUp StoryWalk announces new book

“The Water Princess” by Susan Verde will launch at Brightwater Education Center on March 23.

Bothell’s female leaders celebrate International Women’s Day

Bothell has many women on its executive team and City Council.

Kenmore resident is 2019 humanities speaker

Carlos Gil will speak about immigration, specifically the Mexican American experience.

Romero to speak at next Pub Talk at McMenamins

He will speak about how arsenic was used historically as a common pesticide, spreading poison across the United States.

Inglemoor’s Vuu serves as page in State House

Pages’ responsibilities range from presenting the flags to distributing amendments on the House floor.

Wastemobile begins household hazardous waste collection season in Bothell, Feb. 22-24

Visit Wastemobile website for details about acceptable materials and amounts, plus upcoming collection events and convenient, permanent disposal sites

Most Read