From left, clinic director Steve Michalski, executive director Allison Lowy Apple and director of operations Christopher Jones of A.P.P.L.E. Consulting with the business’s BHCOE certificate of accreditation. Photo courtesy of A.P.P.L.E. Consulting

From left, clinic director Steve Michalski, executive director Allison Lowy Apple and director of operations Christopher Jones of A.P.P.L.E. Consulting with the business’s BHCOE certificate of accreditation. Photo courtesy of A.P.P.L.E. Consulting

A.P.P.L.E. Consulting earns two-year BHCOE accreditation

The Bothell-based ABA therapy service is the first in Washington to receive this accreditation.

A.P.P.L.E. Consulting, an applied behavioral analysis (ABA) therapy service in Bothell, recently received a two-year Behavior Health Center of Excellence (BHCOE) accreditation for its commitment to quality improvement.

Established in 2005, A.P.P.L.E was one of the first companies to provide ABA services to children with autism and their families in the Puget Sound area. The business serves clients from birth to age 21 and provides in-clinic, in-home and in-school services.

A.P.P.L.E. emphasizes cross-disciplinary team collaboration and coordination to produce meaningful outcomes for individuals with autism and related disorders across the varied environments in which they live, play, and learn.

BHCOE recognizes behavioral health providers that excel in the areas of clinical quality, staff qualifications, and consumer satisfaction and promote systems that enhance these areas. A.P.P.L.E. is the only provider in Washington to receive this accreditation.

Dr. Allison Lowy Apple, executive director and founder of A.P.P.L.E., said she and her team are so happy and excited to receive this accreditation.

“I feel very proud of all the work we have been able to do and continue to do,” she said. “I’m proud we’ve been able to maintain high quality staff and services for so long and look forward to our future.”

Sara Gershfeld Litvak, founder of BHCOE, said A.P.P.L.E.’s dedication to “clinical excellence is remarkable.”

“We are proud to commend executive director Dr. Allison Lowy Apple,director of operations Dr. Christopher Jones, and clinic director Steve Michalski, as well as their fantastic team, for creating a program that provides the highest quality service to the special-needs community of Washington,” Litvak said in a press release.

Apple said the accreditation is just another way to show the community that they’re there and that they “do a lot of good for the kids [and families].”

“We are honored to be receiving the BHCOE accreditation because it reflects our commitment to our clients and our clinical integrity,” Apple said. “Our agency is honored to continue serving the Washington autism community for years to come.”

For more information about the BHCOE, visit bhcoe.org. For more information about A.P.P.L.E Consulting, visit www.apple-asd.com.


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A.P.P.L.E Consulting serves clients from birth to age 21 and provides in-clinic, in-home and in-school services, focusing on producing meaningful outcomes for individuals with autism and related disorders across the varied environments in which they live, play, and learn. Photo courtesy of A.P.P.L.E Consulting.

A.P.P.L.E Consulting serves clients from birth to age 21 and provides in-clinic, in-home and in-school services, focusing on producing meaningful outcomes for individuals with autism and related disorders across the varied environments in which they live, play, and learn. Photo courtesy of A.P.P.L.E Consulting.

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