Photo courtesy city of Kenmore
                                From left to right: Corina Pfeil, Melanie O’Cain, Rod Dembowski, Milton Curtis and David Baker.

Photo courtesy city of Kenmore From left to right: Corina Pfeil, Melanie O’Cain, Rod Dembowski, Milton Curtis and David Baker.

Baker, Herbig continue as Kenmore mayor, deputy mayor

They were appointed at the Jan. 13 council meeting, during which councilmembers were also sworn in.

David Baker and Nigel Herbig are continuing on in their roles as the mayor and deputy mayor of Kenmore, respectively.

Baker, who was nominated for the position by councilmember Milton Curtis, has served on council since 2003 and was last reappointed mayor Jan. 16, 2018. This is Baker’s fifth term on council.

Herbig, who was nominated for the role by newly elected councilmember Corina Pfeil, has been on the council since 2014 and was last appointed deputy mayor two years ago.

The deputy mayor and mayor were reappointed through a unanimous verbal vote. Councilmembers serve staggered four-year terms, while the mayor and deputy mayor hold their positions over two-year stretches.

Incumbent Curtis and the recently elected Melanie O’Cain and Pfeil were also sworn in at the Jan. 13 council meeting, during which the appointments were made.

This is Curtis’ fourth term. O’Cain, who grew up in Kenmore and eventually returned after time away, is currently an accounting records and administration manager for the Port of Seattle. Pfeil has 18 years of service to the dental/medical field and has lived in the city for the last three decades.

Rod Dembowski, of King County Council, led the swearing-in process.

“I did this a couple years ago and it was a real pleasure and an honor, and I’m very proud of our partnership between King County and the city of Kenmore,” he said.

In his opening remarks, he touched on his excitement about progress on transportation, sustainability, homelessness mitigation and more.

Dembowski was particularly complimentary of Baker.

“In my seven years now on the county council, there has been no stronger champion in the region for a city that I have seen that Mayor Dave Baker has been for Kenmore…I’m deeply appreciative of all you do for Kenmore,” Dembowski said.

As part of the swearing-in, Dembowski also offered gifts to councilmembers: green energy tea, a Kind bar, chocolate and hand sanitizer in a nod to some of the challenges presented by the job.

Kenmore is structured around a council-manager government, which entails that the mayoral positions are elected by the council every two years.

Councilmembers Stacey Denuski and Brent Smith did not run for reelection.

The Kenmore City Council will next congregate at a Jan. 21 special meeting, which is past the Reporter’s deadline.

To watch the appointments, go to bit.ly/2Nn7SLu.

More in News

The language of the original bill prohibited privately-owned detainment facilities from being contracted by local, state, or federal government entities, but a last-second amendment was adopted to substantially narrow the focus of the legislation. File photo
Lawmakers flinch on banning for-profit detention facilities

Last minute amendment exempted ICE detainment facility.

A proposal to make King County Metro fares free for low-income households could be approved in the coming months. File photo
King County considers free transit for low-income residents

The program would target those at or below 80 percent of the federal poverty level.

Driver forgot he had heroin | Bothell police blotter

Jan. 28 Domestic: At 6:30 a.m. a verbal dispute between two brothers… Continue reading

Federal Way resident Mi’Chance Dunlap-Gittens, 17, died Jan. 27, 2017. Courtesy photo
Law enforcement challenges report on sting operation that killed Federal Way teen

King County Office of Law Enforcement Oversight’s findings rattle Sheriff’s Office, police union.

Unstable housing? Apply for Section 8

Applications open in February for housing vouchers

In 2018, the city of Seattle approved and then repealed a head tax within a month. It would have levied a $275 per employee tax on businesses grossing more than $20 million annually. Sound Publishing file photo
County head tax bill passes committee

Bill would let King County levy a tax on businesses to fund housing and address homelessness.

Gov. Jay Inslee signs the first bill of the 2020 legislative session into law. On the right stands the bill’s primary sponsor, Sen. Jamie Pedersen, D-Seattle, who is wearing a red tie. Photo by Cameron Sheppard, WNPA News Service
Gov. Inslee signs tax bill to help fund higher education

Law shifts a portion of the tax burden to large tech companies.

NSD Superintendent Dr. Michelle Reid presents the third annual State of the Schools on Feb. 5. Madison Miller/staff photo
NSD holds third annual State of Our Schools event

Dr. Michelle Reid updates community on what the district has accomplished over the past year and what’s on the horizon.

Photo courtesy of Suzan DelBene
                                Dana Van Buecken and Suzan DelBene team up to combat the drug pricing issue.
Kenmore woman advocates for better drug pricing at SOTU

Rep. Suzan DelBene and Dana VanBuecken discuss drug pricing prior to the State of the Union address.

Most Read