Bothell voters approve public safety ballot measures

As of election night on Nov. 6, both the levy and bond were passing.

Bothell asked its citizens to decide the city’s public safety future when they voted on two measures: a public safety levy called Proposition 1 and a fire station bond called Proposition 2.

As of election night on Nov. 6, Prop. 1 was passing with about 60 percent of the vote, while Prop. 2 was passing with 64 percent. A levy needs a simple majority (50 percent, plus one) to pass. Bonds are a little more difficult, as they require a 60 percent threshold.

Results are according to the King County Elections website and include results from both King and Snohomish counties.

Prop. 1 is a 12-year levy lid lift that would fund staffing, operating and program needs, including 13 additional police officers, six firefighters, five police civilians and two staff in information services and facilities to support public safety departments. The cost is 44 cents per $1,000 of assessed valuation, meaning it will cost the owner of a $500,000 home about $220 per year.

Prop. 2 is a 20-year capital bond that would fund the complete rebuild of two fire stations (Canyon Park and Downtown), including public safety upgrades, technical modernization and energy efficiency to accommodate current and future growth. It would cost the owner of a $500,000 home about $130 per year (26 cents per $1,000 of assessed valuation).

Washington votes by mail and ballots can be postmarked as late as Election Day, meaning results could change in the following days. Check back this week for updated results.

Results can also be found at www.kingcounty.gov/elections. The election will be certified on Nov. 27.

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