Candidate funding for Northshore city races

Bothell and Kenmore each have four city council positions up for election this November.

Bothell

Four city council positions are up for election this November and the Aug. 6 primary narrowed the field. The Reporter looked into candidate funding for candidates vying for positions on the city’s council.

For Pos. 2, Mason Thompson and Leigh Henderson filed to run for the seat currently held by Andy Rheaume.

As of Aug. 6, Thompson had raised nearly $7,800, with more than $6,400 coming from individual donors. Thompson donated $1,000 to his own campaign, as did two other individuals with the same last name. The Washington State Democrats contributed roughly $250 to his campaign, according to the Public Disclosure Commission (PDC).

Thompson had only spent around $1,400 as of Aug. 6, including money for graphic design, securing a WordPress and to the Washington State Democrats.

Henderson had raised nearly $5,100, with $3,200 coming from individuals. She received $1,000 from the Affordable Housing council as well as $500 from Steve Fields and $300 from Rosemary McAuliffe. Fields is a Redmond city council member currently running for the city’s mayoral position and McAuliffe is a Bothell city council member.

Large expenditures from Henderson’s campaign included nearly $3,000 to NWP Consulting, $1,875 to Lauren Archer and $1,445 to Kris Gorshkov for campaign management-related expenses.

In Pos. 4, incumbent James McNeal is running against Matt Seymour. McNeal had reported no campaign fundraising, and Seymour chose to run as mini-filer, meaning finance reporting is not required so long as a candidate raises less than $5,000.

Davina Duerr had raised more than $5,300 to try and retain her seat in Pos. 6 against challenger Sean Palermo. Palermo is also a mini-filer and fundraising data was not available on the PDC website. Candidate Tiger Budbill had not filed anything with the PDC as of Aug. 6.

Of Duerr’s funding more than $5,000 came from individual donors and about $250 from the Washington State Democrats. Duerr had spent $2,100 with Capitol City Press for mailers and postcards, as well as an additional $450 with North Creek Designs for postcards.

Kenmore

Four positions on Kenmore’s city council were also up for election in Pos. 1, 3, 5 and 7.

In Pos. 1, Melanie O’Cain is running against Suzanne Greathouse. O’Cain had raised nearly $1,800 and spent $316, putting her in the same ballpark as Greathouse who had raised nearly $1,900 and spent more than $1,600.

More than $1,700 of O’Cain’s funding came from individual donors, with her largest single expense coming from the $104 filing fee. Greathouse’s campaign is largely self-finances, with the PDC reporting she contributed all of her own funding with the exception of a single $100 contribution. Greathouse had spent around $974 on yard signs at Jet City Printing, $434 on self-made door-hanger cards and $234 on candidate notepads.

Curtis Milton is running unopposed for Pos. 3, as is David Baker in Pos. 5. Milton and Baker were both mini-filer candidates.

In Pos. 7, both Corina Pfeil and Van Sperry chose to run as mini-filers.

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