Via video monitor April 15, Terrence Miller, a retiree living in the Edmonds area, pleaded not guilty to the first-degree murder of Jody Loomis in 1972, during his arraignment at Snohomish County Courthousein Everett. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Via video monitor April 15, Terrence Miller, a retiree living in the Edmonds area, pleaded not guilty to the first-degree murder of Jody Loomis in 1972, during his arraignment at Snohomish County Courthousein Everett. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Edmonds man recently arrested for 1972 murder out on bail

Terrence Miller, 77, posted a bond of $750,000. He’s accused of killing 20-year-old Jody Loomis.

An Edmonds man suspected of killing Jody Loomis of Bothell in 1972 is out of jail. 

Terrence Miller, 77, was recently accused of shooting Loomis in the head on a dirt road over four decades ago, in an area now called Mill Creek. She had been bicycling, and was on her way to the stable where her horse was kept. She was 20 years old.

On Friday, Miller was released from his incarceration after posting bond of $750,000, two months after his arrest. He is charged with first-degree murder.

A breakthrough in the case happened when an Oregon genealogist built a family tree for the suspect based on the crime scene evidence. Police then found that a discarded sample of DNA — from a cup of coffee that Miller allegedly sipped at the Tulalip Resort Casino in August 2018 — matched DNA from semen found on Loomis’ boot, according to charging papers.

The bail amount had been reduced by $250,000 in May. At a court hearing, Jody Loomis’ sister, Jana, said she was worried that Miller would disappear if he were released. The family would be forced to relive the nightmare that has been the past 46 years, she said.

“For those of us that do remain, all we have now is the hope and justice and accountability for the hideous theft of Jody’s life,” she told the court at the May 31 hearing. “And in the 46-plus years since that day, the accused has celebrated birthdays, Christmas, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day. He has married. He has had children. … He has lived his life.”

As part of his release conditions, Miller is required to participate in electronic home monitoring.

A trial is tentatively scheduled for October.

Zachariah Bryan: 425-339-3431; zbryan@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @zachariahtb.


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