Solid waste fee increase Jan. 1, helps King County update facilities, add recycling

  • Friday, December 16, 2016 1:30am
  • News
Solid waste fee increase Jan. 1, helps King County update facilities, add recycling

King County Solid Waste reminds residents that an increase in disposal fees goes into effect Jan. 1, to help cover rising costs and add more recycling options at its facilities, while modernizing a half-century-old solid waste handling system.

The basic fee for bringing solid waste to a King County solid waste facility, when tax and surcharge are included, will increase from $129.40 to $144.34 per ton, and the minimum fee will increase from $22 to $24.25.

The typical single-family curbside customer who puts out one can of garbage per week is likely to see an increase of 77 cents per month in the garbage bill from their hauler to cover the new disposal fees.

The new rate will fund more recycling options at transfer stations aimed at recovering 42,000 additional tons of recyclable materials each year. King County residents and businesses recycle 54 percent of all solid waste generated, yet 70 percent of what is landfilled could have been reused, recycled or composted.

The increased revenue will also help pay for the new Factoria Transfer Station currently under construction in Bellevue, and a new facility in south King County to replace the 1960s-era Algona station.

King County operates eight transfer stations, two rural drop-boxes and the Cedar Hills Regional Landfill. Learn more about the Solid Waste Division at www.kingcounty.gov/solidwaste.


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