Current state of 68th Avenue Northeast. Staff photo/Blake Peterson

Current state of 68th Avenue Northeast. Staff photo/Blake Peterson

Utility work on 68th Ave., Juanita Drive in Kenmore to start this quarter

Each project is making renovations intending to benefit pedestrian and bicycle safety.

Utility work on projects impacting 68th Avenue Northeast and Juanita Drive Northeast is expected to start in the first quarter of this year.

Both undertakings are part of Kenmore’s Walkways & Waterways program, which uses a voter-approved bond measure to fund transportation-related improvements.

Each project is making renovations intending to benefit pedestrian and bicycle safety. According to a press release, new sidewalks and bicycle lanes will be added in both areas.

To prepare for construction, utilities such as Puget Sound Energy and Comcast will be relocated as needed. Traffic delays and some service interruptions will result.

The project on 68th Avenue Northeast will specifically extend from Northeast 182nd Street to 61st Place Northeast. It will result in a new sidewalk that sits on one side of the roadway, new bicycle lanes in both directions, lighting upgrades and renovated stormwater infrastructure.

The Juanita project entails the same upgrades. But it also includes a bus stop refurbishing, road reconstruction in spots that have an asphalt overlay and road widening for individual turn pockets and traffic-signal modifications.

It goes from Juanita Drive Northeast, from Kirkland city limits, to Northeast 170th Street/Simonds Road Northeast, according to the city of Kenmore’s website.

Design and permitting for both projects lasted from 2017-19. Construction is set to last from 2020-21.

As of December 2019, the designs are nearing completion. Advertisements for bids are due for release in March 2020.

Construction, according to the city’s website, is scheduled to begin in May, and continue through summer 2021.

At a public open house for the West Sammamish Bridge project, which is set for 5:30-8 p.m. on Jan. 29 at Kenmore City Hall, the design team for the 68th Avenue Northeast and Juanita projects will be in attendance for questions.

According to the city website, residents who live around the affected areas are encouraged to attend, in part to learn more about how their property frontage might be impacted.

The Juanita project will cost about $16.4 million. It’s funded through several sources in addition to the W&W bond measure, including the Department of Ecology, Kenmore traffic impact fees and Sound Transit system access funds.

The 68th Avenue Northeast Project is about $10.3 million, funded through the city’s real estate excise tax, strategic opportunities fund and more.

For more information about the 68th Avenue project, go to bit.ly/2QvsJx3. For more details on the Juanita project, go to bit.ly/37ob29n. To learn more about the Walkways & Waterways program, go to bit.ly/2rFbukk.


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Rendering of 68th Avenue Northeast after the project is completed. Photo courtesy city of Kenmore

Rendering of 68th Avenue Northeast after the project is completed. Photo courtesy city of Kenmore

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