Sound Cities Association (SCA) Executive Director Deanna Dawson and Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson speak at a SCA dinner in Kenmore. CATHERINE KRUMMEY/Kenmore Reporter

Sound Cities Association (SCA) Executive Director Deanna Dawson and Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson speak at a SCA dinner in Kenmore. CATHERINE KRUMMEY/Kenmore Reporter

Washington attorney general speaks in Kenmore

Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson made a visit to Kenmore last week as the featured speaker at a Sound Cities Association (SCA) dinner.

Kenmore Mayor David Baker is the current president of the SCA Board of Directors, and he emceed the evening.

“Thanks for joining us in the great City of Kenmore tonight,” Baker said.

Ferguson was greeted with a standing ovation by municipal employees, elected officials and others from the Puget Sound region as he came to the front of the ballroom at the Inglewood Golf Club to chat with SCA Executive Director Deanna Dawson.

One of the main topics of conversation was, of course, his battle with the Trump administration over the constituionality of the travel ban implemented through an executive order signed by Pres. Donald Trump earlier this year.

“Everybody has to follow the rule of law … even the president,” Ferguson, who is a former King County councilmember, said.

He said he has received some criticism that his move to stop the travel ban was political, but he pointed out that he also sued the Obama administration twice.

“It’s equal opportunity,” he said. “That’s how we operate.”

He also discussed a variety of other cases he’s been involved with, including the Arlene’s Flowers anti-discrimination suit and a campaign finance case against the Grocery Manufacturers Association. In the latter, the GMA was ordered to pay $18 million in penalties and punitive damages, the largest amount ever in a campaign finance case.

On a lighter note, Ferguson and Dawson discussed the attention he has received following the travel ban, which led to some people pointing out his resemblance to Harry Potter. He said his kids think that’s pretty cool, especially as they are currently reading the Harry Potter books.

Bothell presentation

Bothell City Councilmember James McNeal and Bothell Police Captain Mike Johnson also made a brief presentation to those at the SCA dinner about the “Cops and Cards” program that is being piloted in Bothell.

The program is meant to help police officers be more fully integrated in their communities and engage with youth in a positive manner, starting by handing out sports trading cards. It is just starting in Bothell, and McNeal said they plan to expand it a little more through partnering with the Northshore School District in the next school year.

“We’re just getting started,” he said, adding that the goal is to see the program expand to other cities in the area.


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Sound Cities Association (SCA) Executive Director Deanna Dawson and Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson speak at a SCA dinner in Kenmore. CATHERINE KRUMMEY/Kenmore Reporter

Sound Cities Association (SCA) Executive Director Deanna Dawson and Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson speak at a SCA dinner in Kenmore. CATHERINE KRUMMEY/Kenmore Reporter

Bothell City Councilmember James McNeal and Bothell Police Captain Mike Johnson give a presentation on the “Cops and Cards” program at a Sound Cities Association dinner in Kenmore. CATHERINE KRUMMEY / Kenmore Reporter

Bothell City Councilmember James McNeal and Bothell Police Captain Mike Johnson give a presentation on the “Cops and Cards” program at a Sound Cities Association dinner in Kenmore. CATHERINE KRUMMEY / Kenmore Reporter

Kenmore Mayor David Baker, who is the current Sound Cities Association (SCA) Board of Directors president, serves as the emcee at a SCA dinner in Kenmore. CATHERINE KRUMMEY / Kenmore Reporter

Kenmore Mayor David Baker, who is the current Sound Cities Association (SCA) Board of Directors president, serves as the emcee at a SCA dinner in Kenmore. CATHERINE KRUMMEY / Kenmore Reporter

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