King County Library System — A cradle of democracy | Guest Editorial

  • Friday, November 10, 2017 12:06pm
  • Opinion
Stephen A. Smith. Courtesy photo

Stephen A. Smith. Courtesy photo

By Stephen A. Smith

KCLS Interim Director

On Nov. 3, 1942, a shared vision of democratic ideals and equal access to information became reality when King County voters approved the formation of the King Country Rural Library District — what we know today as the King County Library System.

With Election Day having come and gone, it is fitting to acknowledge the significance of that vote 75 years ago. It established the legal and funding structures to create and maintain a legacy that continues to this day. KCLS is one of the most highly regarded library systems in the nation, thanks to support from King County voters throughout the years.

With every election, voters are reminded of the responsibilities of citizenship and the importance of civic engagement. Faced with making choices at the ballot box that have social, political and economic ramifications, a knowledgeable and well-informed citizenry is as important as ever.

Libraries can help. A wealth of resources is available at any of KCLS’ 49 locations and our expert staff is available to help patrons access the information they need to keep current on candidates and ballot measures. KCLS also encourages patrons to actively participate in conversations on topics that affect communities, both locally and nationally. Programs like “Everyone’s Talking About It” bring people together to talk about issues that potentially spark disagreement. The town hall format offers a moderated setting that promotes respectful dialog so audience members can learn from others’ experiences and gain perspective on differing viewpoints.

For many residents who are studying to become United States citizens, KCLS offers classes where participants can practice reading and speaking English, and take mock interview and citizenship tests. KCLS proudly hosts naturalization ceremonies throughout the year where we celebrate our newest citizens as they recite the Oath of Allegiance in culmination of their hard work and determination.

Philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, well known for his gifts of public libraries across the United States, said, “There is not such a cradle of democracy upon the earth as the Free Public Library, this republic of letters, where neither rank, office, nor wealth receives the slightest consideration.”

In our mission to inspire the people of King County to succeed through ideas, interaction and information, KCLS is committed to keeping the cradle rocking.

Stephen A. Smith is the interim director of the King County Library System.

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