Downtown Bothell cafes offer more than just coffee

From live music to gaming, offer entertainment as well as a caffeine fix.

  • Tuesday, January 15, 2019 4:04pm
  • Business

By Nate Spencer

Special to the Reporter

From the shops on the newly refinished Main Street to the Riverside Park Trail at Bothell Landing, downtown Bothell has a lot of attractions.

The Den Coffeeshop is one such place. Located at 10415 Beardslee Blvd. in downtown Bothell, it is a local favorite for those who frequent the area. And on some weekends it transforms into a venue space that hosts various different musical events.

On these nights, many patrons come to enjoy some local music and entertainment. One such event happened Dec. 1, when Eddie Pruitt, an award-winning bassist, performed for more than a dozen café customers.

“The customers seem to really like when we have people come and play, it creates a really good environment,” said Den employee Christa Tebbs. “It’s a great opportunity to showcase lots of different types of music.”

Songwriters in Seattle is another group that performs at the Den, bringing amateur musicians and entertainers from the Seattle area to showcase their talent for Bothell locals.

In addition to the Den, there is Zulu’s Board Game Cafe, which offers game enthusiasts an opportunity to play board or card games while enjoying a snack. Located at 10234 Main St. in Bothell, Zulu’s menu offers a variety of food and drink options for customers.

The cafe offers a large selection of board games that patrons can use for free while they are eating. There are more than 100 games to choose from, including Codenames, Catan and King of Tokyo.

Zulu’s also offers many different events for people of all ages. Most nights the cafe hosts a “Magic the Gathering” trading card game tournament. There are also board and card game tournaments, which can be found on the on Zulu’s website and in-store.

Nate Spencer is a journalism student at the University of Washington Bothell.

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