Cascadia College sets up shop at Woodinville High

  • Monday, April 14, 2008 6:54pm
  • News

Cascadia Community College foreign-language instructor Yuko Ito will teach a beginner’s Japanese course at Woodinville High beginning April 16. The class will be available for credit to both high-school and college students.

Cascadia Community College will begin offering classes at Woodinville High this week.

Both schools are touting the dual-enrollment arrangement as a win.

Cascadia needed additional classroom space, and Woodinville was looking to expand its course offerings.

“We see it as a creative way to meet our needs,” said Woodinville Principal Vicki Puckett. “It’s beneficial for everyone.”

The courses, consisting of Elementary Japanese and Psychology 101, will be available for college credit to students from both schools.

Juniors and seniors from the Northshore School District can enroll in the classes for free as part of the Running Start program, but younger students will be expected to pay.

The course credits will transfer to any associate’s- or bachelor’s-degree program in the state.

“I like the idea of blurring the lines between high school and community college and four-year institutions,” said Cascadia Dean of Student Learning Margaret Turcott. “It’s important to realize we don’t just drop one thing and start another. They can kind of blend together.”

Cascadia is working to implement a global-studies program that would allow students to transfer credits from its own curriculum to a similar offering at Washington State University.

Students can also use the classes to fulfill part of their high-school-and-beyond plans, which are required for graduation.

“It teaches them how to deal with a college setting, if that’s where they’re heading,” Puckett said.

Woodinville has struggled to find funding for new courses because of declining enrollment.

The trend started after the state implemented growth-management policies that limit development within the school’s feeder pattern.

“This program gives our kids more options without costing us more dollars.” Puckett said. “We need a schedule that’s competitive with other 4A schools in the area, and one of the ways we can do that is through this partnership with Cascadia.”

The Japanese class, in particular, is a rare offering that Woodinville officials expect will help their school stand out.

“Japanese teachers are hard to find,” Puckett said. “To have a teacher who’s willing to teach one class at a high school is very difficult to do.”

The class isn’t one to take lightly. Participants must learn three separate writing systems — Kanji, Hiragana and Katakana — all of which make up the common Japanese dialect.

“It’s difficult to learn, and it takes a lot of discipline,” Puckett said.

“It takes a certain type of student — a very focused student.”

Cascadia foreign-language instructor Yuko Ito says her courses have been popular for students interested in Japanese animation, an art form known as “anime.”

“I’m sure that’s one of the biggest reasons at Woodinville,” she said. “Some people have taken European languages, which are mostly similar, and they want to learn something more exotic.”

Both Cascadia and Woodinville are looking to offer more classes in the future.

“I would be open to Chinese Mandarin,” Puckett said. “It’s becoming a hot language for international business.”

Puckett said she would also like her school to offer upper-level business courses, as well as an English 101 class.

More in News

After Seattle’s controversial employee head tax was repealed, King County Executive Dow Constantine wants to bond against existing tax revenues to generate $100 million for affordable housing. Photo by Joe Mabel/Wikipedia Commons
County executive proposes $100 million affordable housing bond

The money was already coming, but Constantine wants to speed up the process.

Kenmore City Hall. File photo
Kenmore proclaims Pride Week for first time

Pride Week will be June 24-30 in the city of Kenmore.

Kenmore City Hall - Reporter file photo
Kenmore to consider plastic bag ban

Potential ordinance would encourage use of paper, resuable bags.

Sheriffs respond to stabbing in Bothell

A Bothell man stabbed a woman after an argument on June 16.

Seattle and King County officials want a safe injection van

The mobile project—an alternative to permanent sites—still doesn’t have a defined timeline.

An autopsy found that Tommy Le was shot twice in the back during an fatal encounter with a King County sheriff’s deputy. Photo courtesy Career Link
New report calls for increased transparency from King County Sheriff’s Office

The fatal shooting of Tommy Le served as a case study for researchers.

A scene from the 2017 Women’s March Seattle. Photo by Richard Ha/Flickr
County sexual harassment policies could be overhauled

One King County councilmember says male-dominated departments have “workplace culture issues.”

Bothell plans transportation improvements

Projects include road widening and Safe Routes to School.

Western Washington could see more wildfires this year

Lots of grass and warmer weather could make for worsening fire seasons.

Bothell sees benefits of state budget investments

The city received a $2 million check to fund the preservation and conservation of Wayne Golf Course.

St. Edward Lodge renovation to begin in July

The project to turn the old seminary building into a lodge will get underway this July.

Eastside groups discuss homelessness and affordable housing at community events

Five area service providers recently hosted a joint event to educate community members about the impacts of homelessness.