Eastside Audubon participates in one of the world’s largest citizen science initiatives

  • Tuesday, November 21, 2017 12:30pm
  • News

The Eastside Audubon Society will hold its annual Christmas Bird Count on Dec. 16.

Each year on a Saturday in December, Eastside Audubon arranges teams of volunteers to survey bird populations throughout the Eastside. Areas surveyed encompass a large section of the Eastside from Lake Sammamish to the Snoqualmie Valley to Marymoor Park and areas in between.

Unlike a birding field trip, this event will consist of fast moving volunteer groups whose goal to provide census data on birds heard and seen in various areas. This information is combined with that of others across the America’s to provide information on species distribution, climate change, and the health of bird populations. Since the original Christmas Bird Count started in 1900, scientists and conservationist have been able to use this information, along with that of other surveys, to assess long term trends affecting bird populations.

Eastside Audubon is looking for people who would like to participate by serving on a team during the all-day event. Although you don’t have to be an expert, some birding experience is helpful. To participate as part of a team, visit https://eastsideaudubon.org/conservation/citizen-science/christmas-bird-count-1/CBC-teams

Even if someone cannot join a team, they can still participate in this event, according to a press release. Home participants can view birds for two hours on Dec. 16 and report their results to Eastside Audubon for inclusion into this citizen science initiative. To learn more, visit https://eastsideaudubon.org/conservation/citizen-science/christmas-bird-count-1/christmas-bird-count

“This is a unique experience to participate in real science that is being used to see how species are adapting to profound changes in our environment like habitat loss and climate change,” executive director, Tereza Marks said in a press release. “This is important, vital information to the scientific community.”

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