Old Federal Court House (U.S. Court House) in Seattle. Photo by Joe Mabel

Old Federal Court House (U.S. Court House) in Seattle. Photo by Joe Mabel

Former Bothell resident pleads guilty to child pornography and molestation charges

Defendant identified via file sharing software; law enforcement finds images of abuse

  • Thursday, December 21, 2017 3:29pm
  • News

A 53-year old Bothell man pleaded guilty today in U.S. District Court in Seattle to production, distribution and possession of child pornography, announced U.S. Attorney Annette L. Hayes.

Donald McCoy Jr. was arrested in October 2016 and has been in federal custody since that time. McCoy faces a mandatory minimum 15 years in prison and up to 30 years in prison when he will be sentenced by U.S. District Judge James L. Robart on March 12, 2018.

According to records filed in the case, McCoy came to the attention of federal law enforcement in 2016, when an undercover agent using peer-to-peer file sharing software observed images of child rape being shared from a computer tied to an Internet protocol address that traced back to McCoy’s residence. After obtaining the address and a court-authorized search warrant, law enforcement executed the search at McCoy’s home. Forensic examination of various electronic devices revealed that McCoy had made images of the molestation of four young children between the ages of 6 and 13 years old. McCoy molested several of the young children while they were asleep.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. Led by U.S. Attorneys’ Offices and the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims.

For more information about Project Safe Childhood, visit www.justice.gov/psc.

The case was investigated by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) with assistant with the Seattle Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force. The case was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Matthew Hampton.

More in News

Tips for staying safe around Washington wildlife

In the wake of a deadly cougar attack near North Bend here’s some tips on staying safe.

Roza Irrigation District manager Scott Revell inspects a water gauge in the lower Yakima Valley. If a drought pump is installed in Kachess Lake it would mean a more reliable source of water for crops in the valley. Aaron Kunkler/Staff photo
Puget Sound residents worried about Kachess Lake plan

A pump to supply much-needed water to Eastern Washington during droughts could affect recreation.

Candidates file for state, federal office

Twenty-nine candidates are challenging incumbent U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell.

Bastyr University appoints Harlan Patterson as new president

Patterson stepped into the office as interim president following Dr. Powell’s leave last July.

This petroleum refinery in Anacortes is run by Shell, one of the defendants in the suit brought by King County. Photo by Walter Siegmund/Wikipedia Commons
Can King County win its lawsuit against Big Oil?

Legal experts think past lawsuits against the tobacco industry increase the odds of a favorable outcome.

Governor and Secretary of State to fund statewide prepaid ballot postage

King County, however, won’t get any of that money.

Low numbers of Lake Sammamish kokanee raise fears of extinction

Only 19 kokanee salmon returned to spawn this year.

Eastside environmentalists turn up the heat on climate change

Residents are concerned about King County not meeting its greenhouse gas emissions targets.

Foster care homes needed as more children affected by opioid crisis

May is national Foster Care Awareness Month.

Most Read