Man connected to Bothell bank robberies pleads not guilty

The man believed to be the "cyborg bandit" bank robber pleaded not guilty this morning at King County Superior Court.

The 'cyborg bandit' captured at Key Bank in Bellevue on Sept. 24

The man believed to be the “cyborg bandit” bank robber pleaded not guilty this morning at King County Superior Court.

King County prosecutors charged Anthony Leonard Hathaway, 45, of Everett on Feb. 14 with one count of robbery in the first degree after a year-long investigation.

Hathaway was arrested by the Seattle Safe Streets Task Force on Feb. 11 after he was caught robbing a Key Bank in the University District of Seattle.

Post-miranda, Hathaway confessed to committing 29 other bank robberies throughout western Washington during the past year, charging documents state.

Several local robberies were included in his confession, including three in Bothell.

Police had been watching Hathaway the day he was arrested in a year-long investigation the task force had been building since the first robbery in Everett.

Hathaway developed a pattern of wearing a metallic-like fabric over his face, similar to the look of a cyborg, and a long sleeve shirt with eye holes cut out, appearing as an “elephant man.”

During several of the bank robberies, the suspect verbally threatened the teller with a weapon but never displayed one.

In early February, the investigation led detectives to a suspicious white van that had been used in a recent South Snohomish County robbery.

It was this lead that connected Hathaway to the robberies, according to charging documents.

On the day of Hathaway’s last robbery, investigators followed the van from Everett to Seattle for two hours and observed him changing clothes and getting out of the van with a black umbrella near the Seattle Key Bank in the University District.

Hathaway allegedly stole $2,320 from the teller’s cash drawer as he dawned a dark colored mask and told everyone in the bank to “get down” on the floor.

Hathaway is being held on $750,000 bail and is considered a flight risk and danger to the community.

Charging documents state additional charges will be filed for the other bank robberies in the future.

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