Photo courtesy of Northshore Fire Department Facebook

Photo courtesy of Northshore Fire Department Facebook

Northshore Fire benefit charge before voters on Feb. 12

Continuation will provide funding for six years.

Kenmore and Lake Forest Park voters will decide on Feb. 12 if a benefit charge used to fund emergency services provided by the Northshore Fire Department will continue.

For the last 30 years, the department has funded fire protection and emergency services through use of collected property taxes and this voter-approved benefit charge. Benefit charges, unlike property taxes, are based on risk factors and what it costs to provide homes first protection.

Washington law dictates that this charge be approved by voters every six years, and the department’s board of commissioners is required to hold a public hearing to review and reestablish charge amounts.

This amount is prorated to individual properties, based on their risk factors, and collected by the county assessor, along with real estate taxes. Any benefit charge imposed on a property cannot exceed measurable benefits of the services provided by the fire department, according to the explanatory statement on Proposition 1.

Fire districts, which collect benefit charges authorized under Chapter 52.18 RCW have reduced taxing authority, the statement continues. And benefit charges can constitute no more than 60 percent of a district’s annual operating budget. The maximum property tax rate is reduced from $1.50 to $1.00 per $1,000 of assessed valuation.

If approved, Proposition 1 would continue the current funding method of providing emergency medical and fire protection services for six more years.

More in News

VoteWA is a $9.5 million program that came online last May and is meant to unify all 39 county voting systems in the state into a single entity. Courtesy image
WA’s new voting system concerns county elections officials

VoteWA has run into some problems in recent months as the Aug. 6 primary election draws closer.

Getting to know Bothell City Council candidates for position 6

Three are in the running in upcoming primary election.

Bothell counselor was inappropriate with boys, charges say

He allegedly touched a 10-year-old underneath the shirt and often brought up sexual development.

An aerial photo shows the locations of two earthquakes and five aftershocks in and near Monroe, which rattled the Puget Sound region early Friday. The first was the magnitude 4.6 quake at upper right, 13 miles under the intersection of U.S. 2 and Fryelands Boulevard SE at 2:51 a.m. The second, magnitude 3.5, occurred 18 miles under the Old Snohomish-Monroe Road at 2:53 a.m. The aftershocks followed during the ensuing two hours. This image depicts an area about 3 miles wide. (Herald staff and the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network)
Early wake-up call: Twin quakes under Monroe rattle region

Thousands of people felt them. They were magnitude 4.6 and 3.5 and hit minutes apart.

Courtesy photo
King County Sheriff’s Office has been giving ICE unredacted information

Both the office and jail have supplied the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency.

‘Feedback loops’ of methane, CO2 echo environmental problem beyond Washington

University of Washington among researchers of climate change’s effects in global temperatures.

PSE’s battery storage project could help the clean energy roll-out

The tiny pilot project in Glacier could eventually be expanded.

Warning sign for a road closure. File photo
King County examines options to fund roads and bridges

Shortfall is roughly $250 million each year; county may seek tax from unincorporated voters.

Most Read