Said Farzad reportedly called in numerous bomb threats to state agency offices in Olympia. No bombs have been found, but the state agencies are increasing police presence and bomb-sniffing dogs. Reporter File Photo

Said Farzad reportedly called in numerous bomb threats to state agency offices in Olympia. No bombs have been found, but the state agencies are increasing police presence and bomb-sniffing dogs. Reporter File Photo

Suspended psychiatrist suspected of making bomb threats

The suspect was previously convicted of telephone harassment of a Bothell insurance company and has reportedly called in numerous threats from various countries. No bombs have been found.

A psychiatrist whose license was suspended three years ago for threatening to shoot up a Bothell health insurance agency is now suspected of calling in false bomb threats to state agencies.

Said Farzad is currently suspected in 18 cases of telephone harassment after calling with threats to offices in Olympia, Tumwater and some Idaho offices. Farzad was convicted of telephone harassment in 2015 after he made a series of disturbing phone calls to Molina Healthcare of Washington’s Bothell office when the company rejected some of his patient’s claims.

Farzad was last known to be in the United States in June and is currently out of the country, which makes the investigation challenging, according to an Associated Press report. The calls reportedly came from various countries.

Police have found no evidence of bombs and don’t believe Farzad can cause actual harm, but the state offices are treating the threats seriously by increasing police presence and bomb-sniffing dogs.

Farzad lost his medical license in 2014 after a failed appeal and accusations of telephone harassment, which is a felony.

Many of Farzad’s patients were on government-funded health care plans and Molina had to authorize their prescriptions. Farzad would call and become increasingly aggressive when his patients’ prescriptions were delayed or denied coverage.

This culminated in May 2014 when Farzad called five times in one day, threatening to go to the Molina office with a gun. An employee reported Farzad said he was “homicidal” and told her to get the FBI on the line because he felt like murdering people at Molina and wanted to go to their office with machine guns, according to court documents.

Bothell detectives arrested Farzad at his clinic the next day and the Washington State Department of Health suspended his license shortly afterward. Farzad attempted, but failed to appeal the suspension. The state’s Medical Quality Assurance Commission concluded that Farzad threatened public safety and his “ability to practice with reasonable skill and safety was sufficiently impaired by a mental condition,” according to state records.

“[Farzad’s demeanor is] manipulative, controlling, and grandiose, and indicates some type of underlying mental condition that does interfere with his ability to practice as a physician,” the records state.

Farzad was also under investigation for encouraging relationships with two of his patients, reportedly buying them gifts and socializing outside of the clinic.

He was sentenced to a 364-day suspended jail term and anger management classes in 2015, essentially sparing him jail-time if complied with the conditions. He continued to deny making threats to Molina employees.

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