Bothell-Kenmore community shows support for Clark, Ranstrom

Emotional times these are in Bothell and Kenmore. Tough and grueling times, but also hopeful days when good thoughts and actions can reach through the gray moments and make a difference in people’s lives. And members of the Northshore community are stepping up to the plate to help out those in need: specifically Kelly Clark and Duane Ranstrom.

Emotional times these are in Bothell and Kenmore.

Tough and grueling times, but also hopeful days when good thoughts and actions can reach through the gray moments and make a difference in people’s lives.

And members of the Northshore community are stepping up to the plate to help out those in need: specifically Kelly Clark and Duane Ranstrom.

Clark, who was recently injured in a car accident, is slowly — and strongly — on the mend and speaking from her hospital bed. People have pulled through for her and the Clark family with massive support through prayers and a benefit blood drive and production of the “Wizard of Oz.” You can check her progress through passionately written updates at www.carepages.com under Kelly Clark’s Recovery.

According to a June 17 update, Clark says, “Thank you to everyone.”

Tonight, family and friends of Ranstrom — who suffered heart failure and was in a coma at the Reporter’s press time — will host a benefit spaghetti feed (see page 1 for details).

It’s at the same location where Bothell and Inglemoor high-school football supporters chow down before the annual Spaghetti Bowl contest, but this time they’ll be rooting for Ranstrom. He’s a Bothell resident and Inglemoor coach, so both local cities will be represented and bound together for a special cause.

Both these people are lucky to have such strong support systems in an unending list of family members and friends. For Clark, there’s her two children, husband and the Girl Scouts crew, and for Ranstrom, there’s his five children, wife and the football folks. They’ve made a positive impact on everyone involved, and they’re all pulling for Clark and Ranstrom to recover and return to the activities they love most.

For some of us, it’s impossible to put ourselves in these families’ shoes and decipher what they’re going through, but we can do our best and help in any way possible. A letter, a gift, a prayer, a hello — those are the little things that will go a long way during these painful days and nights of waiting for good news to shine their way.

And we here at the Reporter will do our best to get the word out about any upcoming events to benefit Clark and Ranstrom.

We’re here with you, as is the rest of the Northshore community.

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